Friday 3 April

8:00

 Super Ninja Yogic Warrior sessions!

Thien Que Nguyen

Registration and coffee

9:00

Opening plenary

Rooms

Room 16

Room 17

Room 18

9:30

 Soft(ware)Ball

Olivier Azeau

Max: 30 

SoftwareBall website (French)
 Catching the Good Ones

Ralph van Roosmalen &
Daan van Osch


Presentation (5MB PDF)
 The Product Owner Game

Paul Kuijten

Max: 40 

10:45

Break

11:15

 Working With People You Can't Stand

Nicole Belilos

Max: 40 
 Passion for Agile education

Ward Bergmans &
Arno Delhij

Max: 25 
 Visual Facilitation

Jef Cumps


Flipcharts (5MB PDF)

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Afternoon opening plenary

14:00

 Desirements on the fly - is Innovation really that hard?

Per M. Beining

Max: 40 
 How to defeat the Plouf

Guillaume Duquesnay

 TDD Randori

Florin Bombeanu &
Calin Darie

Max: 24 

15:15

Break

15:45

 Exploring your courage and vulnerability

Gitte Klitgaard

Max: 20 

Presentation (7MB PPT)
 The multi-level feedback cycle

Kris Philippaerts


Presentation (9 MB PDF)
TDD Randori

CONTINUED

17:15

Closing plenary

17:30

Drinks offered by QWAN



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Super Ninja Yogic Warrior sessions!

A MORE organized mind, MORE room, fun

Thien Que Nguyen

This workshop will help you to:

1. balance the body and mind
2. get more FLOW
3. fill up your energy
4. get ready to start

You will use ancient Ninja en Yogic practices to get ready for the XP Day!

Goal of the session: fun! energy! relaxation!
Intended audience: anyone, NO need to be flexible, no expectations
Expected experience: Just being present is enough!
Session Type: 30 min experiential learning session

The Objective

After this session you experience:
*total relaxation
*more strength
*being completely away from work
*fun
*more space

Time:
Starts 8.00 - 8.45 am. You can just drop in the class.
After the workshop we'll be ready for a great start of the Mini XP-day.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

Soft(ware)Ball

Improve your skills by programming human components!

Olivier Azeau

A programming game where software design skills are the keys to success.
No computer knowledge required.
No keyboard shortcut wizardry.
Just a team and a ball.

Goal of the session: Discover or re-discover programming practices and principles
Intended audience: Anybody interested in programming practices and principles will benefit from the session, whether you are a developer willing to explore the meaning of refactoring, group programming and SOLID principles or you are a non-developer willing to step into the developer shoes to understand the challenges
Expected experience: Anyone can play
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: SoftwareBall website (French)

Come and play Soft(ware)ball.
A programming game. No computer knowledge required. No keyboard shortcut wizardry.
Just a team and a ball.

Serious gaming has expanded across the agile world in the last few years. However, most of the games still focus on the "individuals and interactions" side. Soft(ware)ball is a game that brings balance by putting software design issues on par with people issues.

Nevertheless, this game is not developer-centric activity such as coding dojos that require programming language skills.

This game uses a very simple "software" concept : human "components", embodied by members of the audience, are given instructions to move a ball around. This concept allows non-technical people to play an active part in the game like any other developer.

The game pace is driven by the expectations of a customer that is constantly discovering new features for a better software.

People with no coding experience will be able to move into a developer's shoes and get a grasp of typical coding challenges: is this refactoring worth the cost? how can I simplify my design to keep it flexible?

Seasonned developers will re-discover standard practices (refactoring, group programming...) or principles (single responsibility, open/closed, dependency inversion...) under a new light.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Catching the Good Ones

How we recruit at RES Software

Ralph van Roosmalen & Daan van Osch

Finding the right people will be one of the biggest problems in IT. In this hands-on session we would like to open up our kitchen and share our recipes to recruit good people that will become successful without challenging our established workforce too much. We want you to experience our process, to find out whether you would have made it and we want you to share your best golden questions and techniques.

Goal of the session: Tips and tricks on how to recruit the best people for your teams
Intended audience: Leo Ellen Georges Vincent
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (5MB PDF)

At RES Software, we accepted the challenge to double the size of the R&D department in two years' time and to grow our department from some 50 people to more than 100. Besides our head office in The Netherlands, we opened an additional software development shop in the USA and Romania. We are scouting for people in the whole world and have already brought on people to relocate from Spain, Italy and China.

Our prime directive is that we want to focus on bringing the best possible people to our teams. We don't want to challenge the absorption levels of our established teams too much because we are convinced that pros want to work with pros. When you bring a good fit with good skills to a team, it will be easier for them to become succesful.

For years we have been struggling to get the right people in the right seat in our development organization. After years of experimenting, optimizing, changing and tuning, we now believe we have a thorough and sound process for shifting the good from the not-so-good. In this hands-on session we will share our vision and beliefs, our processes and we would like to have you share your best practices on recruitment.

For example, we would like to hear your golden recruitment questions, we want you to experience our recruitment workshops and we want to discuss where we all can improve.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
40

The Product Owner Game

Teaching Product Owners to deliver value continuously

Paul Kuijten

Are you a Product Owner that would like to become more value-driven. Are you struggling with helping Product Owners to become more value-driven? Are you looking for tools that can help the Product Owner be the best they can be?

Come play the Product Owner game with us, and experience what value-driven backlog refinement means.

Goal of the session: Participants will play the game and learn. Participants will receive the game to play it with others, and will have the knowledge to play it
Intended audience: Main target audience: Joke, Ellen. Having said that, everyone interested in being value-driven should come
Expected experience: basic agile and Scrum knowledge would be great
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

We are out on a journey, mission if you will, to provide Product Owners with resources that enable them to be the best they can be. We feel it's the next frontier, and we feel that the next decade in agile will be about what it means to be value-driven.

This journey has taken us places, from the Agile Holland meetups, to Scrum Day Europe, to interesting clients. We received inputs from the agile community, and had fun playing and designing games that aid in the mission. The sessions we held all got raving reviews, especially the one at Scrum Day Europe.

We will share this journey with you, and play the latest and greatest incarnation of the Product Owner Game with you.

The game is a turn-based card game, with the objective of delivering as much value as possible. Scarcity and chance play an interesting role.

The team that delivers most value wins the grand prize!!!

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
40

Working With People You Can't Stand

Get the best out of the difficult people around you.

Nicole Belilos

Wouldn’t you like to learn how to work well with the difficult people around you?

In this active session you will learn to spot the 10 most common unwanted behaviors. You will understand why difficult people act the way they do. And you will get the opportunity to discover and try out some new tactics to respond effectively to their behavior. After this session, you will be able to get the best out of people at their worst!

The session will be a mix of lecture, group discussions, role playing and reflection.

Goal of the session: - Become aware of your personal allergies towards certain types of people- Understand why they behave the way they do- Get practical ideas as to how to deal with these people and get the best out of them- Become aware of your own behaviors that other people might not like
Intended audience: Everybody can join. We all know someone we can’t stand.
Expected experience: No special knowledge required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

We all prefer Individuals and Interactions over Processes and Tools.
We also prefer some individuals over other individuals.
And some people we simply... can't stand.

In our daily lives, we encounter people that act in ways we don’t like: whiny people, bullying people, people who think they know it all, people who say nothing at all... At best, our interactions with them are not very successful. At worst, they escalate into conflicts.

Wouldn’t you like to learn how to deal with the difficult people around you?

In this active session you will learn to spot the 10 most common unwanted behaviors. You will understand why difficult people act the way they do. And you will get the opportunity to discover and try out some new tactics to respond effectively to their behavior. After this session, you will be able to get the best out of people at their worst!

The session will be a mix of lecture, group discussions, role playing and reflection.

This session is based on the book 'Dealing With People You Can't Stand' by Dr. Rick Brinkman and Dr. Rick Kirchner.
More information on the book can be found here: http://rickbrinkman.com/store/books/dpcs.shtml

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
25

Passion for Agile education

The secrets to let talent blossom

Ward Bergmans & Arno Delhij

Who remembers what it was like at High School? And why learning wasn’t so much fun at all? And you know why? Because the teacher told you what to do and how to do it, no arguing allowed!

Who had ever thought that education would learn from the IT guys, and what lessons can be learned from Scrum by teachers? If anyone in particular can explain how and why Scrum in education works than it is the students themselves.

After this interactive session you will have gained first hand insight from the students how eduScrum evolved, better understand why and how it works and beyond doubt will never look the same at education.

Goal of the session: Create a sense of curiosity and broaden the knowledge of how to apply Scrum in education
Intended audience: Scrum adventurous
Expected experience: Basic knowledge of Scrum
Session Type: 150 min discovery session

Why education needs change? Watch the RSA Animate YouTube video of Sir Ken Robinson.
If you have planned to come to our session, we recommend you to watch this video beforehand.
If you haven't planned to come to our session, we also recommend you to watch this video! You might find out that you want to attend this Agile education session at the XP Days. :-)

Since a few years Scrum is used to educate students (teens and adults), this has evolved to the eduScrum framework.
With eduScrum students work together in an energetic, targeted, effective and efficient way.
With eduScrum students are stimulated to develop into a valuable member of a team.
eduScrum ascertains a mind-set that aims for constant improvement.
eduScrum is a framework for a cocreative process and supporting.

This new way of education has lead to remarkable results but most of all motivated students that take ownership of their learning process. Once you have seen this live, you’re overwhelmed and understand why this approach has such a potential. Needles to say that this boosted our interest and we decided to devote a fair amount of time and energy to support this fantastic and radical innovation in education.

So, together with the help of some special friends, we’ve created a session about eduScrum that will bring you all the secrets you want to know!
In the true spirit of the eXPerience Days we’ve arranged a teacher and a group of high school students to share their experiences with you!


Back to program

Visual Facilitation

Make your visuals Rock!

Jef Cumps

Make your visuals rock

Goal of the session: Learn how to facilitate meetings graphically
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Flipcharts (5MB PDF)

Create great flipcharts!


Back to program

max
40

Desirements on the fly - is Innovation really that hard?

A few simple steps from idea to real business value

Per M. Beining

Requirements exist in a multitude of different forms in the organization: from ideas in people’s heads, to notes on a napkin, to extremely detailed needs specified in traditional requirements documents. The challenge in every organization is how to get from idea to delivery while optimizing value at every step along the way.

How do you turn vague ideas or burning desires into something tangible that can be used to drive the creation of working products (that delivers real Business Value)?

This session is a presentation of my mental model for doing so - along with tangible techniques for the first steps within that model.

Goal of the session: Discover techniques on the path from Idea/burning desire to formulated desirements.
Intended audience: Marieke, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Innovation is always hard. Or is it?

1. Background
I was a year ago presented with "Communicating through Secure email with our end-users" as the solution for a customers response to the question - "How will your company become Market leader within your primary field of business?".
10 years ago that could have been the solution. But not today.

2. Creating a mental model
I kept thinking of Henry Ford's quote on “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”
So I started thinking, looking, discovering and creating.
I created a step-by-step path (or mental model) to take anyone from a burning desire (or just another vague idea or ordinary fling) to actual implemented Business Value.

3. The steps of the mental model
The first part of this session is a walk through of this mental model for Innovation / creative process.
- Idea Modelling
- Business Objective Modelling
- Solution modelling
- Feature modelling
- Remaining 2 steps: Implementation and Value/Benefit Realization (not covered by the techniques)

For each of these steps - there already exists a multitude of techniques that can aid you.
Bringing you safe from a burning desire to actual Implemented Business Value.

4. Digging into Techniques that could guide your journey
Second part of the session is a short description of techniques I've discovered to be usefull working with the mental model.

5. Outcome of the session
After participating in this session, I hope you will be blessed with the following:
Inspired - wanting to use some of the techniques described in the session
Brave - to view the percieved challenge of creating innovation as something tangable - and then just "Go Do". Speaking up and help to improve when meeting horrible ideas on the path to be implemented.
Driven - with the mental model and the techniques go out and help our customers/companies to create better innovative ideas

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

How to defeat the Plouf

Some dark forces prevent you and your team from taking action : let's go get them !

Guillaume Duquesnay

Sometime focussing on Getting Things Done and various task management doesn't work. This session talks about their worse enemy : the Plouf
Raise your hearts, fellows ! You're not at fault, maybe there's something against you : the Plouf
Silently, subtly preventing you from taking action.
I'm a Plouf hunter, studied it for years. I can teach you how to spot it, counter it, and defeat it.

Goal of the session: Sometime focussing on Getting Things Done and various task management doesn't work. This session talks about their worse enemy : the Plouf
Intended audience: Anyone desperate about actions not being done, on a personal or team level
Expected experience: No experience required
Session Type: 30 min discovery session

You would like to, but you don't do it.
You think about it, but don't take action.
Even in a team, or an enterprise department, sometimes every initiative is just lost.
To the point where any will of improvement fails before it even starts.

Raise your hearts, fellows ! You're not at fault, maybe there's something against you : the Plouf
(In France, we sometimes says ideas made "Plouf", the sound when something drops into water)
And I, a Plouf specialist hunter, have studied for years : how to spot it, track it, defeat it. And I would love to share it with you.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
24

TDD Randori

Build Game Of Life using TDD in a Randori setup!

Florin Bombeanu & Calin Darie

Which developer doesn't like to start from a blank sheet? And do it right from the beginning. Without all that legacy code.

Could be a great opportunity to try out some of those nifty XP-practices too. And maybe peak at someone else's code to see how (s)he did it ...

Well that's exactly what we're going to do. In Java or dot Net. The backlog is full of clear & prioritized stories. You'll move from nothing towards a full-blown application in 2 hours. This session is where you want to be ;-)

Goal of the session: Better understanding of TDD and putting it in practice on a 'real world like' backlog.
Intended audience: Developers
Expected experience: No TDD experience needed. We learn as we code.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

We'll build a 'Game of Life' from scratch using XP practices in a Randori/fishbowl/hot seat setup.

We'll divide in up to 3 groups of max 8 people choosing their technology (in C# or Java). Those groups will work together throughout the workshop.

Each group will then do 'sprints' of 4 'days'. Each day lasts for

  • 8 minutes developing during which 2 developers will work together as driver (writing code) & navigator (assists in keeping focus and design). They'll use the prepared stories to TestDrive their Development. The spectators act as ghosts and monitor progress (silently) on a big screen.
  • 4 minute discussion on what happened and how to proceed

After each day, the driver becomes navigator, the navigator becomes spectator and the next spectator in the circle becomes the driver.

After 4 days we'll have a 12 minute retro in each group to improve further developments (maybe even changing the rules ;-)

After 2 sprints even in groups of 8 people everyone has at least once been able to code.

The hosts of the session already organized a similar event in Bucharest. It was a great success. Evidence can be found online. We've learned what works and what doesn't. Last but not least, we'll have lots of fun.

You should attend to get a better understanding of the added value of TDD, pair programming, collaborating in an ad-hoc team and having fun in the process.

If you're an experienced developer you'll get the chance to help others, show of your skills in front of a crowd if that's your thing, and have fun in the randori :) Join us, we have...code!


Back to program

max
20

Exploring your courage and vulnerability

How to get better at your job

Gitte Klitgaard

Find your own courage by exploring it in this session.

Goal of the session: Know what courage means and have tools to explore their own courage
Intended audience: jan, marieke, leo, bram, georges, vincent,joke, hank, ellen
Expected experience: Nope
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (7MB PPT)

Engange in a workshop where we explore the aspects of courage and vulnerability.
There is a reason that courage was one of the original XP values, and is one of the values in scrum. To work with agile you need to be brave.

What is courage? Why do we need it? How will it help us be better at our jobs? What does vulnerability have to do with courage?

I have worked with this for several years and even have a tattoo with "Be Brave", so I will use examples of my journey in this workshop. The workshop will be a mixture of exercises, examples and theory.

We will explore together and find ways to be brave that we can go home and apply in our jobs.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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The multi-level feedback cycle

Are you sure you close the cycle on all levels?

Kris Philippaerts

An effective feedback cycle in Scrum is more than having Sprints and doing Retrospectives. In this session we analyse different information streams in Scrum and see how we can/should cycle through them effectively.

Goal of the session: A new, refined look at the 'ol Scrum Framework; Strengths, weaknesses and shortcomings in Scrum; Re-inforcement techniques for your own Scrum implementation
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Basic Scrum knowledge is beneficial
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (9 MB PDF)

For most Scrum and Agile adepts, Deming's PDCA cycle (or feedback cycles in general) are as common as a daily cup of coffee. It becomes a second nature for most of us: inspect and adapt, inspect and adapt, inspect and adapt...

However, in reality these feedback cycles can be seen as multi-level communication flows with different types of information that cycle around in different cycles:
- Vision and long-term goals
- Short term functionalities
- Planning and budget
- Implementation processes and quality
- Team dynamics

In order to run your feedback cycles effectively, you must run your PDCA on all of these, from start to end, from P to A.

In this session, we will take a deeper look how Scrum implements these cycles by matching them with the different Scrum Rituals and Artefacts. This way, we will identify where Scrum does and does not provide the necessary links to ensure a closed PDCA cycle on all levels. For the missing links, we will try to harvest ideas and practices to reinforce your Scrum implementation.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?
Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?
Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Olivier Azeau

Olivier Azeau

Website: http://agilitateur.azeau.com/

Twitter: @oaz

Software craftsman
Team lead at Varian Medical Systems
Co-founder of the agile community in Toulouse, France


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Ralph van Roosmalen

Ralph van Roosmalen

Website: http://nl.linkedin.com/in/ralphvanroosmalen

Twitter: @raroos

Innovative Agile Enabler | Management 3.0 Enthusiast

I believe Agile is not a process, it is an attitude. To be successful in an Agile environment you have to be creative, dynamic, open-minded, communicative and positive. Be open for change and flexible in your approach. You need to grow your organization's existing processes / techniques and to adjust them. If necessary you might need to create new tools.

Management 3.0 is about inspiring team members, team leaders, development managers, IT directors, project managers, Agile coaches and HR managers, who face the challenge of getting their organizations into an Agile mindset. The Management 3.0 goal is to grow and transform organizations into becoming great places to work.

My professional values are:


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Daan van Osch

Website: http://www.ressoftware.com/

Daan van Osch is an experienced Scrum Master and has been practicing Scrum since 2006. He started out as a software translator, became a techwriter, software tester, test lead and is currently in management of R&D.

In his current role as the head of a large sustained engineering department, Daan is able to apply his wealth of knowledge about lean and agile principles in the day-to-day management of a challenging department.

In his role as internal scrum master trainer, Daan has been responsible for training all new generations of scrum masters in his company. He is a firm believer of making a 1% change every day in his team, department and company. Most of all, Daan is about making the people in his organization experience a safe, fun and challenging work environment.


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Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten is an experienced Agile/Scrum coach, practicing Scrum since 2006.
Paul is a recovering Prince II practitioner, who once was a pretty bad programmer.

Paul has trained hundreds of people on Agile/Scrum and related topics and regularly presents to various audiences. Paul is a Scrum.org certified Scrum trainer.

Having introduced Scrum in multiple organizations, Paul knows about the pitfalls along the way and the hard work required. More importantly, Paul knows the rewards when you persevere.
He helps organizations move towards more business agility, and effective product development.


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Nicole Belilos

Twitter: @nicolebelilos

Nicole Belilos is an Agile coach and trainer, based in The Netherlands, where she helps organizations, teams and individuals transition to Agile. She is an experienced change agent and has strong communicative and personal skills.

Nicole’s hobbies are public speaking, acting and improvisation. She likes to be on stage, and has played in several amateur productions. With her improvisation games, Nicole combines her hobby with her passion for Agile and learning.


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Ward Bergmans

Ward Bergmans

Website: http://nl.linkedin.com/in/wardbergmans

Twitter: @wardbergmans

Ward works as an independent Agile Coach. He has 10 years experience with Agile and Scrum and is the founder of the Agile Government Platform in the Netherlands. During an agile coaching assignment at a large government organisation (The Council for the Judiciary) he worked together with Arno. There they found out that the both had (and still have!) a keen interest in education.

The first time Ward learned about eduScrum he had a conversation with students who used eduScrum. The happiness that radiated from these teenagers while talking about their school and the results it brought to them, really struck Ward in his heart. Ward immediately became a Friend of eduScrum.


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Arno Delhij

Arno Delhij

Website: http://nl.linkedin.com/pub/arno-delhij/6/41b/bb1/

Twitter: @arnodelhij

Agile Philosopher and Agile by Nature that's how best to describe Arno. Although IT has boosted Agility Arno is a firm believer that Agile is the paradigm for the next century, in all possible fields. Agile is a way to approach problems and should focus on finding root-cause solutions rather than trying to cover up symptoms. Having experienced all possible forms of education and finding that none of them really embrace discovering the full potential of human beings together with his experience as an Agile Coach it was only a 'natural' step to become involved in eduScrum (Agile education). Together with Rini van Solingen and Willy Wijnands he wrote the eduScurm guide, a framework for Agile Education. With his former colleague Ward they discovered what Scrum could learn from eduScrum and started working on an analysis and presentation - based on their findings. It's his passion to facilitate the discovery of the full potential of human beings. His agile philosophy goes further than his work only. In his free-time he dedicates his time training his sheep dogs in an Agile way, by trial and error and with a lot of love and passion they learn a lot of one another ;-)


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Jef Cumps

Jef Cumps

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @jcumps

Jef Cumps is a very experienced Agile coach and trainer supporting multiple large organisations in their transition towards Scrum and Agile. He is and has been leading enterprise changes covering all levels (individual, teams, management, organization).

As a trainer, Jef has gained a lot of experience in training various topics related to management and efficiency: Scrum, Lean, Kanban, communication, people management and effectiveness. Next to his knowledge and experience, his major asset is his coaching attitude getting the most out of people and organizations.

Jef is Certified Kanban Practitioner, Certified Scrum Trainer and Certified Scrum coach. Jef presented several sessions on XP Days and other conferences in the past.


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Per M. Beining

Per M. Beining

Website: https://www.youtube.com/user/perbeining

Twitter: @perbeining

Per is part of the team behind one of Denmarks leading company within the field of Agilily: Ugilic (www.ugilic.dk).

Per's key skills are Agile project leadership and mentoring in IT environments. Working together with developers, business sponsors and management, he helps organizations implement Agile while considering existing culture, processes and governance (including PMO), and the organization's Agile maturity.
Educating and training people and organisations in how to apply Agile and Scrum is also close to his heart. And how to create and work with requirements is one of his current main focus areas.

Per is a DSDM Certified APL Practitioner and Certified Scrum Master and Product Owner. He has many years experience using traditional approaches to project management and systems development, and is a Certified Prince2 Practitioner, Certified IPMA Level C project leader, and Certified ITIL Foundation Level practitioner.

Per started his career as a software developer (perl, java and HTML). He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Copenhagen Business School, and has solid experience in telecommunications, media, transportation & logistics, finance/banking, and the military.

Write to Per at per@ugilic.dk or call +45 4030 8307.


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Guillaume Duquesnay

Guillaume Duquesnay

Website: http://agileapreslecole.fr

Twitter: @duquesnay

Guillaume is a jack of all trade and a passionate storyteller.
He relentlessly crosses his various experiences, from roleplaying game to non profit organization involvement, or professionally as a coder, consultant or coach. Always on new stuff, challenging his beliefs, he makes connections, trying to see core principles through things and refining his practices.
As a playful mind and a fine observer of small meaningful details, he is not shy when it comes to getting offbeat or wild during his sessions when he wants to share his thoughts.


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Florin Bombeanu

Florin Bombeanu

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/pub/florin-bombeanu/2a/4ab/b11

.NET and Agile enthusiast, continuous learner. Open to learning new technologies and skills.


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Calin Darie


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Gitte Klitgaard

Twitter: @nativewired

Gitte Klitgaard is an Agile Coach, Pirate, Dragon Lady, Hugger, friend, and much more. She is agile; live it and love it. She has taken the oath of non-allegiance. Gitte has more than 10 years experience in different aspects of software development and is currently working with Agile and people. She wants to change the world by helping people in their work life. She is a geek and very passionate about a lot of stuff :)


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Kris Philippaerts

Kris Philippaerts

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @kphilippaerts

Hi, my name is Kris and I'm an Agile Coach and Trainer at iLean. I assist organizations in adopting an agile culture and in implementing agile and lean techniques such as Scrum and Kanban.

I love communicating with different people in different styles. During the years, I developed a vast experience in organisatorial coaching. Together with my undeniable technical roots, this gives me the ability to understand both management and team members, and help them communicate with each other more effectively.

Next to organisatorial coaching, I'm also a passionate Agile trainer and I often facilitate workshops and sessions on Agile Conferences. During my trainings and workshops, I always aim to find a good match between the conceptual ideals and the not-so-ideal reality. I use my extensive coaching experience to pervade my trainings with hands-on examples and loads of tips and tricks.


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions