Thursday 27 November

6:55

 Rise and Shine sessions!

Olivier Costa &
Thien Que Nguyen

8:00

Registration and Coffee

9:00

Opening plenary

Rooms

de Uitdaging

de Visie

het Samenspel

de Interactie

het Inzicht

9:30

 Functional Programming and Test Driven Development

Bas Bossink &
Bart de Boer

Computer

 Catching the Good Ones

Ralph van Roosmalen &
Daan van Osch


Presentation (5MB PDF)

 Agile transition and formal change management

Dieter Dehaes &
Frank Geelen

Max: 24 

Presentation (2 MB PDF)

 Valuable Agile Retrospectives: The Making of

Ben Linders


Presentation on Slideshare

 What happened to the Why?

Gitte Klitgaard &
Lilian Nijboer

10:15

Functional Programming and Test Driven Development

CONTINUED

Catching the Good Ones

CONTINUED

Agile transition and formal change management

CONTINUED

 How to defeat the Plouf

Guillaume Duquesnay

 Agile Client : a romantic relationship to build

Huy Canh Duong &
Anais Victor

Max: 40 

10:45

Break

11:15

Functional Programming and Test Driven Development

CONTINUED

 Your Path to Agility

Dajo Breddels

 The multi-level feedback cycle

Kris Philippaerts


Presentation (9 MB PDF)

 How do we scale agile?

Paul Kuijten

Max: 32 

 Desirements on the fly - is Innovation really that hard?

Per M. Beining

Max: 40 

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Afternoon opening plenary

14:00

 TDD Randori

Florin Bombeanu &
Calin Darie

Max: 24 

 I’m not a servant, I’m a host!

Pierluigi Pugliese &
Marco Calzolari

Max: 40 

Presentation on Slideshare

 Asteroids

Daan van Berkel &
Robin van Kaathoven

Computer
Max: 20 

The asteroids Universe is explorable

 The agile release train game

Jef Cumps &
Bart Oste

Max: 40 

Presentation (7 MB PDF)

 You keep talking about Value, but I do not think it means what you think it Means

Matteo Vaccari

Max: 30 

15:15

Break

15:45

TDD Randori

CONTINUED

 Intrinsic agile coaching

Patrick Steyaert &
Maarten Hoppen

Asteroids

CONTINUED

The agile release train game

CONTINUED

 Wired to connect

Jenni Jepsen

Max: 40 

17:15

Closing plenary

18:00

Drinks offered by Rally Software Development

19:00

Dinner with drinks offered by Zilverline

21:00

 Za Zen - evening session

Olivier Costa

22:00

 Yoga Meditation - evening session

Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 25 



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Rise and Shine sessions!

Prepare your body & mind for 2 days Full Throttle energy and more!

Olivier Costa & Thien Que Nguyen

In this workshop you 'll get introduced to ancient Japanese and Indian techniques for modern-day challenges:

What do ZaZen and Yogic practices have in common?
The practices help you with:
1. balancing the body and mind through the physical body,
2. breathing practices to work on the energy body, equated with Ki or Chi
3. and meditation to calm and focus the mind.
4. incorprating all practices with full awareness to learn about all aspects of your personality

Goal of the session: You're ready for an intensive day of learning
Intended audience: Anyone with the courage to get up early :)
Expected experience: being human is enough
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

What's it about ?
In this workshop you will be given some practical techniques from ancient traditions to apply for modern-day challenges:

Zazen is a technique to train your mind to keep seeing the whole picture.
Yoga practices uses postures to balance the body and mind through the physical body, breathing practices to work on the energy body, equated with Ki or Chi and meditation to calm and focus the mind.

The plan
At 6.55 am, before the xpday sessions begin, we come together for a short intro.

When our mind is calm and attentive, we stand up and practice some of the traditional exercises inherited from the samurai, Chinese & Indian traditions. Seemingly simple movements with powerful effects inside the body and mind.

The Objective
Provide you with powerful techniques which you can apply right away to handle your daily life situations.
Introduce you to what may be the beginning of an enriching daily routine. Because as simple as they appear, so endless can these arts be studied.

Benefits for participants and presenter
After the workshop, you'll be energized and ready for a very interactive & productive day. As our ancestors already knew: Mens sana in corpore sana, is the foundation for great achievements.

Practical:
The workshop will be held on both days from 6.55 - 8.00 am.
After the workshop we 'll have breakfast together and be ready for a great XP-day.

Some info on the trainers
Olivier Costa is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns these techniques from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a japanese grandmaster and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.
Thien Que Nuyen is Satyananda Yoga instructor, she has been trained by Bihar School of Yoga from old an yogic tradition from the North of India.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Portable computer

Functional Programming and Test Driven Development

A match made in heaven

Bas Bossink & Bart de Boer

Functional programming has made a come back in the last couple of years. In this session we will explore why Functional Programming (FP) and Test Driven Development (TDD) are a perfect match.

Goal of the session: Learn the benefits of using functional programming techniques when using test driven development.
Intended audience: Jan
Expected experience: no prior experience in Functional Programming or Test Driven Development is required.
Session Type: 75 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Functional programming has made a come back in the last couple of years. In this session we will explore why Functional Programming (FP) and Test Driven Development (TDD) are a perfect match.

In practical assignments attendees will get the opportunity to experience that doing TDD with a functional programming language is easy and fun. The use of small and to the point functions facilitate using baby steps with TDD. Test smells like Test Code Duplication are easily addressed using FP techniques. Even 'legacy code' is not that scary because local functions can easily be promoted to top-level functions after which they can be tested. After a very brief introduction into Chicken Scheme, we will proceed with a small kata to get acquainted with the development tools. We will continue to build the case for TDD in an FP world using several different exercises. For this session no previous experience with FP is expected, some experience with TDD will make this session more rewording but it is not mandatory. The objective of this session is to show participants that doing TDD in an FP setting is easy, fun and productive. When you wish to attend this session please install a recent version of VirtualBox since the development environment for this workshop will be supplied as a VirtualBox virtual appliance.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Back to program

Catching the Good Ones

How we recruit at RES Software

Ralph van Roosmalen & Daan van Osch

Finding the right people will be one of the biggest problems in IT. In this hands-on session we would like to open up our kitchen and share our recipes to recruit good people that will become successful without challenging our established workforce too much. We want you to experience our process, to find out whether you would have made it and we want you to share your best golden questions and techniques.

Goal of the session: Tips and tricks on how to recruit the best people for your teams
Intended audience: Leo Ellen Georges Vincent
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (5MB PDF)

At RES Software, we accepted the challenge to double the size of the R&D department in two years' time and to grow our department from some 50 people to more than 100. Besides our head office in The Netherlands, we opened an additional software development shop in the USA and Romania. We are scouting for people in the whole world and have already brought on people to relocate from Spain, Italy and China.

Our prime directive is that we want to focus on bringing the best possible people to our teams. We don't want to challenge the absorption levels of our established teams too much because we are convinced that pros want to work with pros. When you bring a good fit with good skills to a team, it will be easier for them to become succesful.

For years we have been struggling to get the right people in the right seat in our development organization. After years of experimenting, optimizing, changing and tuning, we now believe we have a thorough and sound process for shifting the good from the not-so-good. In this hands-on session we will share our vision and beliefs, our processes and we would like to have you share your best practices on recruitment.

For example, we would like to hear your golden recruitment questions, we want you to experience our recruitment workshops and we want to discuss where we all can improve.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
24

Agile transition and formal change management

Howto formalise the change management whilst keeping focus on the agile transition

Dieter Dehaes & Frank Geelen

Join this session to learn about a hands-on change management approach you can start using as from tomorrow. You'll learn about the cycle of change and the 3 levels of resistance giving you the tools to understand, influence and manage change in your team, project, organisation.

Goal of the session: Participants will get insight in the profound but very easy to use change management approach as described by Rick Maurer. They will be able to start using this approach as soon as they leave the session. This approach will give them the basis on which they can further develop their change management skills.
Intended audience: This session is most valuable for agile coaches, ScrumMasters, Product Owners and leaders or managers involved in the implementation of agile or plainly everybody who has some interest in the mechanics and dynamics of change
Expected experience: No upfront knowledge required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation (2 MB PDF)

During this session you will learn how to use a simple descriptive framework to visualise and manage the change management aspects of an agile transition. This framework is based on the work of Rick Maurer and focuses mainly on 2 easy to understand and usable dimensions: the cycle of change and the levels of resistance.
The first part of the session will cover the concepts, during the second part you will apply the concepts to (one of) your agile transition context. You will leave the session with an easy to understand visual representation of this change/transition and ways to manage it from there on. During this second part Jef Cumps (who is attending the conference) will join us in facilitating you.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Valuable Agile Retrospectives: The Making of

A story on two guys writing a book, who never met each other face 2 face

Ben Linders

Writing a book by two people who never met each other face 2 face when they wrote, published and promoted the book is an amazing experience! Having it translated by self organized agile teams all around the world makes it awesome!!! Come and hear how we did this and what made it work, and learn how you can effectively work with people all around the world.

In 2013 Luis Gonçalves and I wrote the book Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives. We did this by working together fully remote. We self-published it in December 2013 and gained many readers worldwide. We never met each other in person until April 2014, and are still collaborating to promote the book and helping teams worldwide to get more value out of doing agile retrospectives.

In 2014 we started with teams of volunteers all around the world to translate our book. Working remotely with people that you don't know, from different cultures, with their own ways of working, and on different continents is certainly challenging, but it turned out to be an effective and fun way to do it!

Join this session to learn:
- how you can get to know people and work together remote, i.e. without meeting face 2 face;
- which tools you can use to collaborate and communicate when working remote together;
- how you can translate a book with self organized distributed agile teams of volunteers;
- and how value, trust and respect can make it all possible.

Goal of the session: Inspire and empower people to collaborate with each other all over the world! Learn how to work remotely in an effective and efficient way.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: No
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
Materials: Presentation on Slideshare

In 2013 Luis Gonçalves and I wrote the book Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives. It was published on December 19 and current has over 5000 readers worldwide. The book is being translated into 9 languages with volunteer teams all over the world.

Writing a book together, having it published and getting so many readers from all over the world is an awesome experience. Certainly when you take into account that Luis and I have never met each other face 2 face when we wrote, published and promoted the book!

We first learned from our writings on retrospectives via our blogs. One thing led to another and after a couple of emails we decided that we wanted to write a minibook for InfoQ. We've done everything working remote using Trello, Dropbox, GoogleDocs, Leanpub and Skype to mention some. The first (and only time) that Luis and I saw each other face 2 face was in Amsterdam on April 12 2014. At that time, the book was out for more than 3 months and we had already over 4000 readers.

All of this proves that you don't have to live close to each other to write a book, the Internet provides lot's of ways to do it remotely. But that's just the tools side of it.

Writing a book with a guy that you've never met cannot be done unless you have trust and respect. Trust in that people are basically good and want to do great things. Trust in that if a person cannot do something, they will say so. Respect for everything that a person does, big and small things. Respect for the skills and knowledge that a person has. Which increases when you become aware that there are things that you can't do, but somebody else can (and vice verse). Then you really become a team!

Our book is being translated to many languages with teams of volunteers in different countries. Translating for us is another way to share knowledge and experience with agile retrospectives. Our volunteer teams consist of highly motivated driven people. They want to know about retrospectives and this is a way for them to learn the retrospective exercises and use them in their daily work. As authors we support them by explaining the exercises, answering questions and sharing our knowledge and experience.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

What happened to the Why?

Gitte Klitgaard & Lilian Nijboer

Somehow the why often gets lost whether we talk about the work we do, the processes we follow or the change we want.
Come to our session and find out why we need the why.

Goal of the session: Become aware of just how important the why is
Intended audience: ellen, joke, vincent, georges, bram, leo, marieke, jan
Expected experience: None needed
Session Type: 30 min discovery session

All too often we look at the ”what” and the ”how”, but what happened to the ”why”?

The why is very important; important to motivate people, to guide our implementations, to make us ask questions.

It is important when we introduce processes, when we make products, and when we make features.

We implement agile by following scrum rules and don't ask "why?"; we make a webpage by coding and don't ask "why?"

So why is the "why" so often ignored, forgotten or just left out?

We will talk about the importance of remembering the why and its benefits.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

How to defeat the Plouf

Some dark forces prevent you and your team from taking action : let's go get them !

Guillaume Duquesnay

You would like to, but you don't do it. You think about it, but don't take action.
May be the Plouf is against you, subtedly preventing you from taking action. I'm a Plouf hunter, studied it for years. I can teach you a few tips and tricks and safety rules.

Goal of the session: Sometime focussing on Getting Things Done and various task management doesn't work. This session talks about their worse enemy : the Plouf
Intended audience: Anyone desperate about actions not being done, on a personal or team level
Expected experience: No experience required
Session Type: 30 min discovery session

You would like to, but you don't do it.
You think about it, but don't take action.
Even in a team, or an enterprise department, sometimes every initiative is just lost.
To the point where any will of improvement fails before it even starts.
In France, we sometimes says ideas made "Plouf" (sound when something drops into water)

If you reached some point of frustration like too many teams I worked with, you know perfectly well the consequences. No more ideas brought on the table ; everyone blaming each other for any idea lost ; cynicism spreading in all hearts. And it's getting worse day after day.
Raise your hearts, fellows ! You're not at fault, maybe there's something against you : the Plouf
And I, a Plouf specialist hunter, have studied for years how to spot it, track it, and defeat it. And I would love to share it with you.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
40

Agile Client : a romantic relationship to build

The client relationship as a romantic relationship : managing it in an agile way, it make it easier

Huy Canh Duong & Anais Victor

"Imagine that your client is your girlfriend (or boyfriend)... What would you do to increase your relationship? Just Love her/him, and you'll know what to do...

Goal of the session: Good tips from your own experience to engage an Agile Client, and to build a strong relationship
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)

Customer Engagement techniques are like dating tech: each one has his own secret tips… Share yours!

Go back to the Agile Values to understand how to build a romantic relationship with an Agile Client :
# Individuals and interactions over processes and tools... it's about knowing each over in order to build a strong relationship

# Working Software over comprehensive documentation... it's about being pragmatical, and doing the best to keep an easy-going and working relation rather than being stuck in papers (wedding, shared accounts...)

# Customer Collaboration over Contract Negociation... it's about working to improve the collaboration in the couple rather than focusing on the negociation, sharing tasks, compromises, adaptation...

# Responsding to change over following a tool... it's about being out of routine by spicying up the relationship and making it evolve by iterations


Back to program

Your Path to Agility

becoming increasingly Agile with the help of Spiral Dynamics

Dajo Breddels

Is real Agile even possible for your organization? This isn't about skills, but about core values and beliefs.

Goal of the session: •Understand the value of values •Understand what a value system is and how this applies to Agile •Learn how to assess the different value systems in your organisation •Learn about the different kinds of Agile implementations based on their underlying value systems •Learn how to help an organisation to transform from one value system (colour) to the next
Intended audience: Ellen, Leo, Georges, Vincent, Joke
Expected experience: Experience with Agile implementations
Session Type: 75 min

Agile software development is no longer the sole domain of little obscure IT companies with their own gurus. Even the most traditional companies are adopting agile methodologies. Finally, recognition! But alas it comes with some drawbacks.

“Doing Agile” instead of “Being Agile” is one of those drawbacks I keep encountering more and more. Values don’t change overnight by just showing people the agile manifesto and sending them to a two day training.

But how can you change the values of individuals and teams or even worse, whole organisations? That's what this session is about!

Luckily, there is a thing called Spiral Dynamics and it’s all about: how people get certain values, why they defend them and how these values evolve over time. Spiral Dynamics is based on 30 years of research done by psychology professor Clare W. Graves.

With the help of Spiral Dynamics we are going to:

1) Discover the different kinds of Agile implementations based on value systems.

2) Recognize them in our own teams and organisations.

3) Know how we can help teams and organisations move from “Doing Agile” to “Being Agile”.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

The multi-level feedback cycle

Are you sure you close the cycle on all levels?

Kris Philippaerts

An effective feedback cycle in Scrum is more than having Sprints and doing Retrospectives. In this session we analyse different information streams in Scrum and see how we can/should cycle through them effectively.

Goal of the session: A new, refined look at the 'ol Scrum Framework; Strengths, weaknesses and shortcomings in Scrum; Re-inforcement techniques for your own Scrum implementation
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Basic Scrum knowledge is beneficial
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (9 MB PDF)

For most Scrum and Agile adepts, Deming's PDCA cycle (or feedback cycles in general) are as common as a daily cup of coffee. It becomes a second nature for most of us: inspect and adapt, inspect and adapt, inspect and adapt...

However, in reality these feedback cycles can be seen as multi-level communication flows with different types of information that cycle around in different cycles:
- Vision and long-term goals
- Short term functionalities
- Planning and budget
- Implementation processes and quality
- Team dynamics

In order to run your feedback cycles effectively, you must run your PDCA on all of these, from start to end, from P to A.

In this session, we will take a deeper look how Scrum implements these cycles by matching them with the different Scrum Rituals and Artefacts. This way, we will identify where Scrum does and does not provide the necessary links to ensure a closed PDCA cycle on all levels. For the missing links, we will try to harvest ideas and practices to reinforce your Scrum implementation.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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32

How do we scale agile?

You are asking the wrong question!

Paul Kuijten

A very common thing people ask about agile is “How do you scale it to the enterprise?”. That is asking the wrong question!

After all, does agile want to be the enterprise or does the enterprise want to be agile?
What is it thus that you need to scale?

You will find out the how and the why, rooted in anti-fragility.

Goal of the session: Participants will understand the concepts of anti-fragility and optionality, and how they are related to achieving more agility at scale.Participants will never look at scaling in the same way! They will be able to determine what might work, and what is nonsense with regards to agility at scale, or adjusting scale to become more agile.
Intended audience: Bram, Leo, Ellen, others as well
Expected experience: Anything but completely novice is okay
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Scaling agile leads to pain and suffering, and less results. My experiences coaching, training and consulting within the most radical large-scale agile journey I've ever seen in the Netherlands suggest that scaling agile is the tail wagging the dog.

In this exploratory session, we will look at how to benefit from agility by looking at scaling in a different way. This starts with asking the right question: “How do I scale my organization to benefit from more agility?”

We will answer the question utilizing the concepts of Anti-fragility and Optionality, as put forward by N.N. Taleb.

How does the organization benefit from:

- A lot of loosely connected parts;
- Autonomy of these parts;
- Failure of these parts.

We will look at nature, society, science, profession and craftsmanship. We will draw parallels from these with the way we organize the work with agile, and derive guidance on how to approach scaling related to agile.

The session is intended for people interested in and involved with agility at scale. Let’s stop the pain and suffering resulting from the misunderstanding of the nature of our challenges!

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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40

Desirements on the fly - is Innovation really that hard?

A few simple steps from idea to real business value

Per M. Beining

Requirements exist in a multitude of different forms in the organization: from ideas in people’s heads, to notes on a napkin, to extremely detailed needs specified in traditional requirements documents. The challenge in every organization is how to get from idea to delivery while optimizing value at every step along the way.

How do you turn vague ideas or burning desires into something tangible that can be used to drive the creation of working products (that delivers real Business Value)?

This session is a presentation of my mental model for doing so - along with tangible techniques for the first steps within that model.

Goal of the session: Discover techniques on the path from Idea/burning desire to formulated desirements.
Intended audience: Marieke, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Innovation is always hard. Or is it?

1. Background
I was a year ago presented with "Communicating through Secure email with our end-users" as the solution for a customers response to the question - "How will your company become Market leader within your primary field of business?".
10 years ago that could have been the solution. But not today.

2. Creating a mental model
I kept thinking of Henry Ford's quote on “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”
So I started thinking, looking, discovering and creating.
I created a step-by-step path (or mental model) to take anyone from a burning desire (or just another vague idea or ordinary fling) to actual implemented Business Value.

3. The steps of the mental model
The first part of this session is a walk through of this mental model for Innovation / creative process.
- Idea Modelling
- Business Objective Modelling
- Solution modelling
- Feature modelling
- Remaining 2 steps: Implementation and Value/Benefit Realization (not covered by the techniques)

For each of these steps - there already exists a multitude of techniques that can aid you.
Bringing you safe from a burning desire to actual Implemented Business Value.

4. Digging into Techniques that could guide your journey
Second part of the session is a short description of techniques I've discovered to be usefull working with the mental model.

5. Outcome of the session
After participating in this session, I hope you will be blessed with the following:
Inspired - wanting to use some of the techniques described in the session
Brave - to view the percieved challenge of creating innovation as something tangable - and then just "Go Do". Speaking up and help to improve when meeting horrible ideas on the path to be implemented.
Driven - with the mental model and the techniques go out and help our customers/companies to create better innovative ideas

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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24

TDD Randori

Build Game Of Life using TDD in a Randori setup!

Florin Bombeanu & Calin Darie

Which developer doesn't like to start from a blank sheet? And do it right from the beginning. Without all that legacy code.

Could be a great opportunity to try out some of those nifty XP-practices too. And maybe peak at someone else's code to see how (s)he did it ...

Well that's exactly what we're going to do. In Java or dot Net. The backlog is full of clear & prioritized stories. You'll move from nothing towards a full-blown application in 2 hours. This session is where you want to be ;-)

Goal of the session: Better understanding of TDD and putting it in practice on a 'real world like' backlog.
Intended audience: Developers
Expected experience: No TDD experience needed. We learn as we code.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

We'll build a 'Game of Life' from scratch using XP practices in a Randori/fishbowl/hot seat setup.

We'll divide in up to 3 groups of max 8 people choosing their technology (in C# or Java). Those groups will work together throughout the workshop.

Each group will then do 'sprints' of 4 'days'. Each day lasts for

  • 8 minutes developing during which 2 developers will work together as driver (writing code) & navigator (assists in keeping focus and design). They'll use the prepared stories to TestDrive their Development. The spectators act as ghosts and monitor progress (silently) on a big screen.
  • 4 minute discussion on what happened and how to proceed

After each day, the driver becomes navigator, the navigator becomes spectator and the next spectator in the circle becomes the driver.

After 4 days we'll have a 12 minute retro in each group to improve further developments (maybe even changing the rules ;-)

After 2 sprints even in groups of 8 people everyone has at least once been able to code.

The hosts of the session already organized a similar event in Bucharest. It was a great success. Evidence can be found online. We've learned what works and what doesn't. Last but not least, we'll have lots of fun.

You should attend to get a better understanding of the added value of TDD, pair programming, collaborating in an ad-hoc team and having fun in the process.

If you're an experienced developer you'll get the chance to help others, show of your skills in front of a crowd if that's your thing, and have fun in the randori :) Join us, we have...code!


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40

I’m not a servant, I’m a host!

Host Leadership: a better metaphor for leadership in an agile organisation

Pierluigi Pugliese & Marco Calzolari

In agility we talk a lot about servant leaders, based on the metaphor from Robert Greenleaf where this is opposed to the attitude of the leader as a hero. Yet, a servant has no power and no rights and has rather a subordinate position that undermines the possibility of influencing the peers. The alternative is the leader as a host attitude: a new metaphor for leadership that models much better the role of a leader in an agile organisation.

Goal of the session: - Understand the origins and the limits of the Servant Leader metaphor we use in agility- Learn what host leadership is (a concept from Mark McKergow - http://hostleadership.com/about/) - Understand the value of the leader as a host: why is this much better than just a servant and what are the options available to a host that are not available to a servant- Understand the metaphor of the host as a way to contextualise leadership- Apply the learning to the leadership of an agile organisation
Intended audience: Bram, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Basic experience in a leadership role
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation on Slideshare

In agility we talk a lot about servant leaders, based on the metaphor from Robert Greenleaf where this is opposed to the attitude of the leader as a hero. Yet, a servant has no power and no rights and has rather a subordinate position that undermines the possibility of influencing the peers. The alternative is the leader as a host attitude: a new metaphor for leadership that models much better the role of a leader in an agile organisation.

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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20
Portable computer

Asteroids

The Machine Wars

Daan van Berkel & Robin van Kaathoven

In this session you will dodge and weave your fighter around the asteroid field. There is only one catch... you will need to write code to do so.

Goal of the session: Participants will learn the basics of an Artificial Intelligence technique and how to apply that knowledge
Intended audience: Software developers with an interest in exploring new paradigms
Expected experience: Participants should be comfortable with Object Oriented programming, willing to learn a new subject and not afraid of JavaScript
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: The asteroids Universe is explorable

Asteroids is an arcade game in which you control a fighter that is bombarded by asteroids and attacked by flying saucers. It is a hostile environment that is ideally suited for Machine Learning.

In this session we will provide a framework that will enable you to write the Artificial Intelligence of a (fleet of) fighters. A participant is provided with the means to extract sensory data from the asteroid fighter to provide as input to several machine learning algorithms, like neural networks and reinforcement learning, that will determine the behaviour of the fighter. It is your objective to score as many points as possible and outscore the other teams.

Starting with limited possibilities in a controlled environment, a team's AI must complete objectives of increasing complexity to unlock the full potential of the Asteroids fighter capabilities. After completing the objectives, the full API is available and the written AI is transferred to the Asteroids arena in which other teams can be encountered.

The constructed AI can now be expanded on, to create a squad of fighters that will roam the arena in search of points that can be earned by gunning down hostile objects. The controlled environment is still available and can be used to test new iterations of the AI, as well as running cycles to train the AI if the chosen algorithm requires it (e.g. Reinforced learning algorithms or neural networks).

Choosing the right tool is an important part of successful solution of a problem. With this session participants we learn a new tool and get hands on experience how to apply it.


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40

The agile release train game

Play and learn how to scale agile planning and execution

Jef Cumps & Bart Oste

Join this session to learn about scaling agile. We will run a simulation game to experience scaled release planning and execution. You'll become part of one of the teams that collaborate to build and deliver an awesome playground by the end of this session.

Goal of the session: The goal of this session is to learn about scaling agile. More specific, it is about how to successfully run a large release planning with several teams working on the same product and how to deliver releasable product together with those teams in an agile release train. Because this is not a theoretical session but a simulation game, participants will experience the dynamics, communication and decision-making of planning and execution scaled release trains in which teams self-organize. This will give insights in the potential value and benefits but also risks of large scale agile.
Intended audience: Everybody interested in scaling agile
Expected experience: No, not really, although scrum or XP experience will help
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation (7 MB PDF)

This is an interactive workshop, centered around the 'Scaled playground' simulation game, which is a proven simulation game in which participants plan and build a playground with several teams. This game gives participants insights in how to do release planning and delivery across several teams working on the same product or value stream.

The session will start with some minimal background about scaling agile and the concept of Agile release trains, to understand some patterns of having several teams working together on a single, shared release. Next, we go into the 'Scaled playground' exercise to experience such a large, release planning meeting across teams, including the necessary functional, technical and architectural alignment and decisions. After that, the teams will together build and deliver the playground to experience working in an agile release train.

This session was conducted on the Work = PLAY conference in June 2014 and received very good feedback.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

You keep talking about Value, but I do not think it means what you think it Means

Learn how to learn what your customers really want

Matteo Vaccari

The key to success is delivering value. Yes, but what is value? We keep talking about value, yet we rarely stop to think what it really is. The customer does not want “functionality”: they already have all the functions. What the customer wants is to perform those functions better: better performance, not new functions, and certainly not user stories! Come to this session to learn how to define value precisely and quantitatively.

Goal of the session: Learn to define real requirements for any project in at most one sheet of paper
Expected experience: all levels
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

The key to success is delivering value. Yes, but what is value? We keep talking about value, yet we rarely stop to think what it really is.

To me, "value" is "what the customer really wants", or "what the customer is happy to pay for". The customer knows what they want; but they will not tell us unless we know how to ask. Hint: the customer does not care about user stories.

To begin to understand what value is, we must first abandon the flawed idea that the customer wants "functionality". The customer already has all the functions. What the customer wants is to perform those functions better: to increase revenue, to decrease cose, to improve quality... In other words, the customer wants better performance, not new functions.

Value is always defined quantitatively: "more of...", "less of..." and is always linked to quantitative business benefits.

Another flawed idea is that what the customer asks for is the requirement. Actually, the customer usually comes to us with a design idea... our job is to discover what is the real need behind that design idea. You ask for "login with userid and password" but you really want security. How much security? Defined how? You ask for "help with these Excel macros", but what you really need is to transform data; how much data? how fast? with how much accuracy?

In this session we learn how to uncover the real requirements behind projects. Real requirements are stable and can be described in a single sheet of paper.

This session comes from (my understanding of) the work of Tom and Kai Gilb.


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Intrinsic agile coaching

Agile coaching without coaches

Patrick Steyaert & Maarten Hoppen

What if the role of the coach were to be redefined as a facilitator to the process of sharing experiences in and between teams, rather than the coach being the accumulator of all experience. Wouldn't this be more empowering for the teams and more self-organizing?
In this session, participants will explore a format to facilitate experience sharing between agile teams through story telling and narratives.

Goal of the session: learn how to structure the process of sharing experience between agile teams
Intended audience: Ellen, Hank, Joke, Georges
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Imagine you are an agile coach in a large organization and one of the teams you are working with has just pulled off a big delivery and you decide to celebrate the win. You invite coaches and members from other teams. While in the pub - after a couple of beers -, the team members spontaneously start to share experiences about their agile journey. You reflect upon this with the other coaches that are present. It is amazing how much the teams can learn from each other. Upon further reflection you notice how the stories you just heard also give you a lot of insight in how the teams actually work. More insight than the darn agile assessment tool that the external coach (or should I say consultant?) has been using to "assess" teams. The thought alone of an agile assessment tool gives you the shivers. Sure enough, quickly, all teams have started to score high on the assessment; they comply, but are they truly becoming more agile because of it? You have a dark feeling that it is quite the opposite.

What if the role of the coach were to be redefined as a facilitator to the process of sharing experiences between teams, rather than the coach being the accumulator of all experience. What if you could gain insight in how teams work without the co-notation of "assessment" and "compliance". Wouldn't this be more empowering for the teams and more self-organizing?
In this session participants will explore a format to facilitate sharing experiences between (agile) teams. By doing so
• you will get an insight in the experiences of other participants,
• create a context for your own experience and
• learn how to structure the process of experience sharing.
The way we will do this is by archetype construction. On the basis of stories of the participants about their agile team, we will look for archetypical agile teams. These archetypes are not persons but archetype teams with an archetypical agile implementation.

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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40

Wired to connect

Create great relationships with stakeholders with the help of neuroscience and human nature

Jenni Jepsen

Jenni will share the neuroscience behind why we are wired to connect with others, and how we can use what we do naturally to delight our customers and stakeholders every day. In this interactive session, we’ll put theory into practice and look at what changes we need to make in our daily work to focus even more on strengthening these key relationships in the workplace.

Goal of the session: Learn why it's a natural process for us to want to connect with others - and gain tips on how to make the process smoother (whether you're extroverted or introverted). Be reminded about WHY building stronger relationships with customers and stakeholders is so important to creating value in your organization.Gain knowledge of the hard scientific evidence that connecting IS human nature.
Intended audience: Anyone who needs to work with customers or stakeholders
Expected experience: People with all levels of experience are VERY welcome
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Are you reluctant to start improving your relationships with customers and stakeholders because it takes too much time and energy? Well, relationship building is something we humans do naturally! Jenni will share the neuroscience (yes, hard evidence) behind why our brains are wired to connect with others, and how we can put it into use to delight our customers and stakeholders every day. In this fun, interactive session, we’ll put theory into practice and look at what changes we need to make in our daily work to focus even more on strengthening these key relationships in the workplace.

For those of you who remember the session "Flirting with your customers," WIRED TO CONNECT takes it a step further - combining the science behind "why build relationships," with experiences, and tips and techniques to make the process smoother - no matter whether you get your energy from within (introverts) or from others (extraverts).

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Za Zen - evening session

prepare for the evening

Olivier Costa

Learn to sink down you mind

... and wash away old habits that you don't need anymore

Goal of the session: learn how to find your outdated patterns and unprogram them
Intended audience: anyone who dares to explore him/herself
Expected experience: no experience required
Session Type: experiential learning session

What is it
We learn the 3 crucial aspects of what it takes to truly get to know oneself.

When we really know ourselves, we can completely employ ourselves to get where we want to go, with less effort and frustration.

When we don't know ourselves, we get distracted by habits that were once useful but now stick with us even though we do not need them anymore.

Za Zen is a technique polished by ages of practitioners to scrub away ancient habits and allow ourselves to create the mental space to reprogram new habits that help us today and tomorrow.

What do I need
cushion
If you happen to have a cushion to sit on easily, please bring it along. If not, don't worry, I'll bring some of my own. If you can 't sit comfortable on a cushion we have chairs as well.

clothing
Loosely fitting clothes will help you focus.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
25

Yoga Meditation - evening session

A guided experience which might feel like you've been on a little holiday, right now! - no sand, buckets or passports required!

Thien Que Nguyen

The plan

Learn techniques that will enrich your life. Simple practices, step by step, which you can perform at the office, or anywhere else. You do not need anything else, but yourself.

Are you ready to travel light?

Goal of the session:
Intended audience: Anyone who wants to learn how to shift their minds
Expected experience: All levels
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

The plan

What we are going to do? During 1 hour we are going to teach and guide you through:

1. Guided postures - easily to do on a desk chair or standing.
2. Meditation techniques where we use your awareness of senses, usage of your breath, and visualisations.
3. Ending part: a chant technique to change your energy instantly and send you off with something to contemplate about.

Benefits
Many find themselves clear, and creative after a session. Others are more creative and receptive after repeatedly applying these techniques.

Practial info
We have yoga mats and coushions, but if you have your own, please bring it with you. And a blanket to keep you warm.
You do not need to be flexible! All practices are designed for EVERYBODY, if you have certain restraints, we wil adjust the practice to suit your body.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Olivier Costa

Olivier Costa

Website: http://www.aegisoft.be

Olivier Costa

is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns Aikido from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a Japanese grand-master and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.
www.WareNatuur.be

He has always been involved in the whole software development cycle. From (business) idea over development & testing until release, follow up (business satisfaction) and maintenance. While writing code primarily in C#, he became an Agile Coach (for very diverse teams writing in very diverse languages) in search of teams he wants to work in.

My top 2 favorite books are:


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Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?
Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?
Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Bas Bossink

Bas Bossink

Website: http://www.hightechict.nl/

Twitter: @basbossink

Software Developer and mathematician with an interest in creating high quality software in demanding domains, such as optimization and high precision machines. For some more background see the list of Profile links on my blog at: http://basbossink.github.io/.


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Bart de Boer


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Ralph van Roosmalen

Website: http://www.ressoftware.com

Twitter: @raroos

Innovative Agile Enabler | Management 3.0 Enthusiast

I believe Agile is not a process, it is an attitude. To be successful in an Agile environment you have to be creative, dynamic, open-minded, communicative and positive. Be open for change and flexible in your approach. You need to grow your organization's existing processes / techniques and to adjust them. If necessary you might need to create new tools.

Management 3.0 is about inspiring team members, team leaders, development managers, IT directors, project managers, Agile coaches and HR managers, who face the challenge of getting their organizations into an Agile mindset. The Management 3.0 goal is to grow and transform organizations into becoming great places to work.

My professional values are:


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Daan van Osch

Daan van Osch

Website: http://www.ressoftware.com/

Daan van Osch is an experienced Scrum Master and has been practicing Scrum since 2006. He started out as a software translator, became a techwriter, software tester, test lead and is currently in management of R&D.

In his current role as the head of a large sustained engineering department, Daan is able to apply his wealth of knowledge about lean and agile principles in the day-to-day management of a challenging department.

In his role as internal scrum master trainer, Daan has been responsible for training all new generations of scrum masters in his company. He is a firm believer of making a 1% change every day in his team, department and company. Most of all, Daan is about making the people in his organization experience a safe, fun and challenging work environment.


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Dieter Dehaes

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @dehaesd

I truly love working in teams! Working together, enjoying and improving team dynamics and performance makes me happy. Because I am convinced that people and teams need a supporting environment to thrive I have always focussed on organisational development and performance as wel as on people and team management.
I get my energy from constant learning, growing and getting better at doing what I and the teams I am working in do.
During my 11 years at KBC I learned a lot about processes, governance, portfolio, program and project management. Together with a former colleaugue I started the company U-Vision where we could combine this experience and knowledge with our common focus on people and team performance to help improve IT organisations. During the 6 years running U-Vision I evolved from the “old world” to the exiting world of Agile. Together with Jef Cumps and Kris Philippaerts I started the company iLean with a clear focus on assisting our customers in implementing agile and lean techniques (such as Scrum, Kanban, Scaled Agile, Management 3.0...) and adopting an agile culture.


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Frank Geelen

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @tlocts

Frank mainly worked as a project manager in complex ICT projects based on a Prince2 approach, always focusing on the human side of change. He is specialized to facilitate change based on several models using his soft skills and coaching skills to get people on board. He coaches IT project managers, IT management and business managers in achieving their goals.

His specialties:
Facilitation of complex projects, coaching, Change setter, the human side of change, stimulation of personal growth, …
Frank is Prince2 practitioner, ACTP certified coach, certified scrum master, certified Change setter consultant.


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Ben Linders

Ben Linders

Website: http://www.benlinders.com

Twitter: @BenLinders

Ben Linders is a Senior Consultant in Agile, Lean, Quality and Process Improvement, based in The Netherlands. Co-author of Getting Value out of Agile Retrospectives.

As an advisor, coach and trainer he helps organizations by deploying effective software development and management practices. He focuses on continuous improvement, collaboration and communication, and professional development, to deliver business value to customers.

Ben is an active member of several networks on Agile, Lean and Quality, and a frequent speaker and writer. He shares his experience in a bilingual blog (Dutch and English) and as an editor for Agile at InfoQ.


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Gitte Klitgaard

Twitter: @nativewired

Gitte Klitgaard is an Agile Coach, Pirate, Dragon Lady, Hugger, friend, and much more. She is agile; live it and love it. She has taken the oath of non-allegiance. Gitte has more than 10 years experience in different aspects of software development and is currently working with Agile and people. She wants to change the world by helping people in their work life. She is a geek and very passionate about a lot of stuff :)


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Lilian Nijboer


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Guillaume Duquesnay

Guillaume Duquesnay

Website: http://agileapreslecole.fr

Twitter: @duquesnay

Guillaume is a jack of all trade and a passionate storyteller.
He relentlessly crosses his various experiences, from roleplaying game to non profit organization involvement, or professionally as a coder, consultant or coach. Always on new stuff, challenging his beliefs, he makes connections, trying to see core principles through things and refining his practices.
As a playful mind and a fine observer of small meaningful details, he is not shy when it comes to getting offbeat or wild during his sessions when he wants to share his thoughts.


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Huy Canh Duong


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Anais Victor

Anais Victor

Twitter: @anaisvicto

Anaïs, Engagement Leader working in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam since 2012

When I arrived in Vietnam, I was supposed to run an Agile transition with my project teams...

But I was not convinced by Agile at all, as my first steps in agile was : an incomprehensible discussion about scrum & 4 weeks of remote intensive agile coaching by skype... during lunch time

Hopefully I attended my first Agile Tour 2012 in Saigon, and I met few agile lovers who convinced me about the benefits of Agile. Then, I experienced it!

Today, I know that the road is very long to run an agile transition but I'm satisfied about the results and even better in Vietnam as the culture/education can be a strong barrier.

It's why I decided this year to join the Agile Vietnam Board in order to contribute to spread Agile in Vietnam. Fails after fails, success after success, it's time to share about our experiences!


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Dajo Breddels


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Kris Philippaerts

Kris Philippaerts

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @kphilippaerts

Hi, my name is Kris and I'm an Agile Coach and Trainer at iLean. I assist organizations in adopting an agile culture and in implementing agile and lean techniques such as Scrum and Kanban.

I love communicating with different people in different styles. During the years, I developed a vast experience in organisatorial coaching. Together with my undeniable technical roots, this gives me the ability to understand both management and team members, and help them communicate with each other more effectively.

Next to organisatorial coaching, I'm also a passionate Agile trainer and I often facilitate workshops and sessions on Agile Conferences. During my trainings and workshops, I always aim to find a good match between the conceptual ideals and the not-so-ideal reality. I use my extensive coaching experience to pervade my trainings with hands-on examples and loads of tips and tricks.


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Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten is an experienced Agile/Scrum coach, practicing Scrum since 2006.
Paul is a recovering Prince II practitioner, who once was a pretty bad programmer.

Paul has trained hundreds of people on Agile/Scrum and related topics and regularly presents to various audiences. Paul is a Scrum.org certified Scrum trainer.

Having introduced Scrum in multiple organizations, Paul knows about the pitfalls along the way and the hard work required. More importantly, Paul knows the rewards when you persevere.
He helps organizations move towards more business agility, and effective product development.


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Per M. Beining

Per M. Beining

Website: https://www.youtube.com/user/perbeining

Twitter: @perbeining

Per is part of the team behind one of Denmarks leading company within the field of Agilily: Ugilic (www.ugilic.dk).

Per's key skills are Agile project leadership and mentoring in IT environments. Working together with developers, business sponsors and management, he helps organizations implement Agile while considering existing culture, processes and governance (including PMO), and the organization's Agile maturity.
Educating and training people and organisations in how to apply Agile and Scrum is also close to his heart. And how to create and work with requirements is one of his current main focus areas.

Per is a DSDM Certified APL Practitioner and Certified Scrum Master and Product Owner. He has many years experience using traditional approaches to project management and systems development, and is a Certified Prince2 Practitioner, Certified IPMA Level C project leader, and Certified ITIL Foundation Level practitioner.

Per started his career as a software developer (perl, java and HTML). He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Copenhagen Business School, and has solid experience in telecommunications, media, transportation & logistics, finance/banking, and the military.

Write to Per at per@ugilic.dk or call +45 4030 8307.


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Florin Bombeanu

Florin Bombeanu

Website: https://www.linkedin.com/pub/florin-bombeanu/2a/4ab/b11

.NET and Agile enthusiast, continuous learner. Open to learning new technologies and skills.


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Calin Darie


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Pierluigi Pugliese

Pierluigi Pugliese

Website: http://blog.connexxo.com

Twitter: p_pugliese

Pierluigi Pugliese started hacking code so long ago that he cannot remember exactly when anymore. He worked many years in the mobile telecommunication business, both as programmer and as a team leader, providing software for several mobile phones of known brands.

Currently he works as a consultant for software organisations and coach for individuals and teams, focusing on software development and software processes, helping them implementing sound and agile solutions.

Pierluigi is based in Munich and operates through his company Connexxo (www.connexxo.com).


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Marco Calzolari

Marco Calzolari

Website: http://marcocalzolari.com

Twitter: @marcocalzolari

Marco is involved with technology and communication since 1999. He has been a creative writer, a web and motion designer, a software developer and a project manager. He took part in creating the Italian community of Information Architecture practitioners.

Philosopher, inquisitive. Above all, passionate about Rock'n'Roll.

Currently working as a COO in graffiti.it, doing change management with a team committed to improve quality, performance and sustainability of the work pace.


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Daan van Berkel

Daan van Berkel

Website: http://dvberkel.nl/

Twitter: @daan_van_berkel

Daan van Berkel is a enthusiastic software craftsman with a knack for presenting technical details in a clear and concise manner. Driven by the desire for understanding complex matters Daan is always on the lookout for innovative uses of software


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Robin van Kaathoven


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Jef Cumps

Jef Cumps

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @jcumps

Jef Cumps is a very experienced Agile coach and trainer supporting multiple large organisations in their transition towards Scrum and Agile. He is and has been leading enterprise changes covering all levels (individual, teams, management, organization).

As a trainer, Jef has gained a lot of experience in training various topics related to management and efficiency: Scrum, Lean, Kanban, communication, people management and effectiveness. Next to his knowledge and experience, his major asset is his coaching attitude getting the most out of people and organizations.

Jef is Certified Kanban Practitioner, Certified Scrum Trainer and Certified Scrum coach. Jef presented several sessions on XP Days and other conferences in the past.


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Bart Oste

Bart Oste

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @bartoste

Bart Oste is an enthusiastic, motivating and communicative agilist with a constant drive to find improvements in the world around him.

After being Product Owner in a SAFe release train for 3 years, he now coaches organisations to get the best out of their teams by adopting Scrum, SAFe and other Agile best practices. Bart helps teams to self-organise and to increase their cooperation and communication. He guides organisations on their Agile journey.

Besides his coaching activities, Bart enjoys to be a trainer regularly and likes to facilitate Agile sessions.


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Matteo Vaccari

Website: http://matteo.vaccari.name/blog/

Twitter: @xpmatteo

I am a huge fan of Extreme Programming since about 2004. Before that, I got enamored of programming when I saw a BASIC listing on an electronics magazine in about 1977. It went downhill from there :-) I'm still learning new ways to be more effective at programming; both as an individual and as a member of a team. "New" ways for me, anyway :-)

I worked for 5 years as an agile coach and trainer in Sourcesense/XPeppers. I co-organized summer schools on agile programming (http://essap.dicom.uninsubria.it/).

Now I work as an independent agile coach.


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Patrick Steyaert


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Maarten Hoppen

Maarten Hoppen

Hi my name is Maarten Hoppen. I have been working in Agile environments since 2004. I have a background in development and management.

For the last 6 years I have been a full time Agile Coach, a Professional Scrum Trainer at Scrum.org and Accredited Kanban Trainer at the Lean Kanban University. I love working with individuals, teams and organizations to help them adopt Agile and Lean thinking in their work, communication and collaboration. My goal is to improve productivity, create a pleasant workplace and unleash intrinsic motivation.
The last years I see a shift of focus in my work towards management consulting and optimizing the organization as a whole. That is why I also certified as an Evidence Based Management (EBMgt) Consultant at Scrum.org.

Although I am member of Scrum.org and LKU I don't have a preferred method or framework. I am a pragmatic Agilist and always look for the best combination of tools and frameworks to reach the goal we want to achieve.


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Jenni Jepsen

Website: http://www.goagile.dk

Twitter: @jennindk

Jenni’s focus in on helping people in organizations engage more effectively with business goals, create meaning for stakeholders and build trust through the process. She does this with several very talented Agile coaches at goAgile, based in Roskilde, Denmark.

Jenni has extensive experience in change leadership and communications – helping clients overcome internal and external barriers to accomplish business objectives. During the past 20 years, she has coached teams and leaders to enhance how they work together – opening the way for better understanding, increased trust and quicker results – effectively leading teams to success.

After a six-month study on how neuroscience can be used to help leaders lead better, Jenni uses and shares this knowledge in her coaching with leaders at every level. She also speaks and consults on how organizations can increase their business value enterprise-wide.


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions