Friday 28 November

6:55

     Rise and Shine sessions!

Olivier Costa &
Thien Que Nguyen

   

8:00

Registration and Coffee

9:00

Opening plenary

Rooms

de Uitdaging

de Visie

de Samenwerking

de Interactie

het Inzicht

9:30

 Levels of abstraction in making code more readable

Markku Åhman

Max: 21 
 How to find your own style : lessons learnt as a dungeon master

Guillaume Duquesnay

Max: 1000 

InfoQ interview
 Soft(ware)Ball

Olivier Azeau

Max: 30 

SoftwareBall website (French)
 The Product Owner Game

Dajo Breddels &
Paul Kuijten

Max: 40 
 The Power of Empathic Communication

Rob van Lanen

Max: 32 

Materials and photos

10:15

Levels of abstraction in making code more readable

CONTINUED

 Beware Agile is manipulating you!!!

Pierre Hervouet

Max: 100 

Presentation on Slideshare
Soft(ware)Ball

CONTINUED

The Product Owner Game

CONTINUED

The Power of Empathic Communication

CONTINUED

10:45

Break

11:15

 TDD & Assembly Language

Emmanuel Gaillot


Code written during the session (on Github)
 Palace of VSM Mirrors

Bart Oste &
Nick Oostvogels

Max: 25 

Presentation (32 MB PDF)
 Working With People You Can't Stand

Nicole Belilos

Max: 40 
 Product Backlog manifestation - from zero to something

Per M. Beining

Max: 40 
 Anyone can write concurrent code using Test Driven Design? Inconceivable!

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe &
Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 30 

Session materials and resources

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Afternoon opening plenary

14:00

 Coding a Game from Examples

Wim Heemskerk &
Martin van Dijken

Computer
Max: 24 
 Agile Coaching for 300 people, let's run an Agile Team Building!

Anais Victor

Max: 40 
 Passion for Agile education

Ward Bergmans &
Arno Delhij

Max: 50 
 Pixar storytelling to Infinity and Beyond!

Ron Eringa &
Laurens Bonnema

TO BE CONFIRMED

15:15

Break

15:45

Coding a Game from Examples

CONTINUED

 Entangling artefacts

Matti Schneider

Max: 16 

Presentation on Speakerdeck
Passion for Agile education

CONTINUED

 Exploring your courage and vulnerability

Gitte Klitgaard

Max: 20 

17:15

Closing plenary

18:00

Closing drinks



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Rise and Shine sessions!

Prepare your body & mind for 2 days Full Throttle energy and more!

Olivier Costa & Thien Que Nguyen

In this workshop you 'll get introduced to ancient Japanese and Indian techniques for modern-day challenges:

What do ZaZen and Yogic practices have in common?
The practices help you with:
1. balancing the body and mind through the physical body,
2. breathing practices to work on the energy body, equated with Ki or Chi
3. and meditation to calm and focus the mind.
4. incorprating all practices with full awareness to learn about all aspects of your personality

Goal of the session: You're ready for an intensive day of learning
Intended audience: Anyone with the courage to get up early :)
Expected experience: being human is enough
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

What's it about ?
In this workshop you will be given some practical techniques from ancient traditions to apply for modern-day challenges:

Zazen is a technique to train your mind to keep seeing the whole picture.
Yoga practices uses postures to balance the body and mind through the physical body, breathing practices to work on the energy body, equated with Ki or Chi and meditation to calm and focus the mind.

The plan
At 6.55 am, before the xpday sessions begin, we come together for a short intro.

When our mind is calm and attentive, we stand up and practice some of the traditional exercises inherited from the samurai, Chinese & Indian traditions. Seemingly simple movements with powerful effects inside the body and mind.

The Objective
Provide you with powerful techniques which you can apply right away to handle your daily life situations.
Introduce you to what may be the beginning of an enriching daily routine. Because as simple as they appear, so endless can these arts be studied.

Benefits for participants and presenter
After the workshop, you'll be energized and ready for a very interactive & productive day. As our ancestors already knew: Mens sana in corpore sana, is the foundation for great achievements.

Practical:
The workshop will be held on both days from 6.55 - 8.00 am.
After the workshop we 'll have breakfast together and be ready for a great XP-day.

Some info on the trainers
Olivier Costa is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns these techniques from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a japanese grandmaster and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.
Thien Que Nuyen is Satyananda Yoga instructor, she has been trained by Bihar School of Yoga from old an yogic tradition from the North of India.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
21

Levels of abstraction in making code more readable

Learn to recognize between levels of abstraction in order to better communicate your intent in code.

Markku Åhman

Is your code a mess? Make it a bit less messy by learning to distinguish between levels of abstraction.

Goal of the session: To realize that it affects the readability of code if the level of abstraction is consistent or not. To learn to better recognize the inconsistencies in levels of abstraction - it is hard to fix the problems if you don't see them.
Intended audience: Software developers and people coaching them. Jan, Leo, Bram, Hank, Ellen.
Expected experience: Beginner to intermediate in writing software
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

A function should do only one thing. Does this mean a function should only have one line of code? Of course not! Then how to know whether multiple lines of code do one thing or many? One of the keys is that there should be only one level of abstraction per function. There can be multiple related lines of code but they should be all of the same level of abstraction. This workshop is a hands-on exercise on separating a given sequence of operations into functions and sub-functions at different levels of abstraction.

Laptops not needed.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
1000

How to find your own style : lessons learnt as a dungeon master

From a directive style to a cooperative style, how I evolved as a dungeon master along 20 years of practice

Guillaume Duquesnay

An inspiring story for leader roles and managers : How my posture evolved as a dungeon master along 20 years of practice, from authoritative to cooperative, and where it leads me.

Goal of the session: Inspire managers, scrum masters and facilitators to find their own style
Expected experience: No specific experience required on anything
Session Type: 30 min discovery session
Materials: InfoQ interview

I'm playing dungeons and dragons with a pack of friends every one or two month. My role-play experience is somewhere close to 20 years long, much longer than my 10+ years of professional experience. Indeed, it may be that some of my best management, facilitation and leadership lessons come from game mastery more than work.

First, you simply try to have your friends playing an inspiring adventure. No work to do, no boss to please, just a common goal : enjoy every bit of it. So where's the deal ?
Well, give your friends swords, spells, and treasures, and you'll have to deal with nasty players, cheaters, impulsive behavior, selfishness, and bullies. The challenge is : how to have your friends back as you love them, smart, fun, educated, then play the best adventure they never played ?

If you want to hear it, I will tell you my journey as a game master. We will teleport back in the 90's, you'll meet some of my older friends, and follow us through the years, living our best and worst moments of gaming. I will share what I learned, which touches facilitation, leadership, management, involvement, and much more. On a more intimate level, we will see how and my own style and perception of the game has evolved. This evolution has inspired in return my professional and personal life. I think it might inspire you either.


Back to program

max
30

Soft(ware)Ball

Improve your skills by programming human components!

Olivier Azeau

A programming game where software design skills are the keys to success.
No computer knowledge required.
No keyboard shortcut wizardry.
Just a team and a ball.

Goal of the session: Discover or re-discover programming practices and principles
Intended audience: Anybody interested in programming practices and principles will benefit from the session, whether you are a developer willing to explore the meaning of refactoring, group programming and SOLID principles or you are a non-developer willing to step into the developer shoes to understand the challenges
Expected experience: Anyone can play
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: SoftwareBall website (French)

Come and play Soft(ware)ball.
A programming game. No computer knowledge required. No keyboard shortcut wizardry.
Just a team and a ball.

Serious gaming has expanded across the agile world in the last few years. However, most of the games still focus on the "individuals and interactions" side. Soft(ware)ball is a game that brings balance by putting software design issues on par with people issues.

Nevertheless, this game is not developer-centric activity such as coding dojos that require programming language skills.

This game uses a very simple "software" concept : human "components", embodied by members of the audience, are given instructions to move a ball around. This concept allows non-technical people to play an active part in the game like any other developer.

The game pace is driven by the expectations of a customer that is constantly discovering new features for a better software.

People with no coding experience will be able to move into a developer's shoes and get a grasp of typical coding challenges: is this refactoring worth the cost? how can I simplify my design to keep it flexible?

Seasonned developers will re-discover standard practices (refactoring, group programming...) or principles (single responsibility, open/closed, dependency inversion...) under a new light.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
40

The Product Owner Game

Teaching Product Owners to deliver value continuously

Dajo Breddels & Paul Kuijten

Are you a Product Owner that would like to become more value-driven. Are you struggling with helping Product Owners to become more value-driven? Are you looking for tools that can help the Product Owner be the best they can be?

Come play the Product Owner game with us, and experience what value-driven backlog refinement means.

Goal of the session: Participants will play the game and learn. Participants will receive the game to play it with others, and will have the knowledge to play it
Intended audience: Main target audience: Joke, Ellen. Having said that, everyone interested in being value-driven should come
Expected experience: basic agile and Scrum knowledge would be great
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

We are out on a journey, mission if you will, to provide Product Owners with resources that enable them to be the best they can be. We feel it's the next frontier, and we feel that the next decade in agile will be about what it means to be value-driven.

This journey has taken us places, from the Agile Holland meetups, to Scrum Day Europe, to interesting clients. We received inputs from the agile community, and had fun playing and designing games that aid in the mission. The sessions we held all got raving reviews, especially the one at Scrum Day Europe.

We will share this journey with you, and play the latest and greatest incarnation of the Product Owner Game with you.

The game is a turn-based card game, with the objective of delivering as much value as possible. Scarcity and chance play an interesting role.

The team that delivers most value wins the grand prize!!!

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
32

The Power of Empathic Communication

How to interact from the heart

Rob van Lanen

After this session, you will have experienced how to take the toughest feedback possible as (just)an expression of another person's need. You have seen how it is possible to enrich your communication and how you can free your communication of moralistic judgments. You have experimented with practicing empathic understanding and may want to explore this further.
The session itself will consist of a theoretic explanation of the concepts and mostly of an interactive DOJO in which we will practice the concepts using Non Violent Communication.

Goal of the session: To have a tangible way to improve their personal and/or business communication
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Novice
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Materials and photos

Non Violent Communication is a framework for (inter) personal communication. From our field of work in IT, we know other simple frameworks, like Scrum. These frameworks are, despite the simplicity, not easy to implement in the way desired. So is the case with Non Violent Communication
(https://www.cnvc.org/about/what-is-nvc.html)

After this session, you will have experienced how to take the toughest feedback possible as (just) an expression of another person's need. You have seen how it is possible to enrich your communication and how you can free your communication of moralistic judgments. You have experimented with practicing empathic understanding and may want to explore this further.
The session itself will consist of a theoretic explanation of the concepts and mostly of an interactive DOJO in which we will practice the concepts using a NVC card game (GROK).

Disclosure: There is a warning here, chances are your view about communication changes in such a way that you need to dive deeper and deeper and that you hear judgements, or even better, other person's needs more louder and louder. This may give you something to chew on after the conference.

Intended audience: people who are open to improve their communication skills, in their personal situation and/or business environment.

Experience with the content: The presenter has experience in running DOJO with large groups of people. The content of the session has been practiced as part of advanced Scrum Master trainings and the feedback provided by the participants has been incorporated in the sessions

(please check out the url on top for an explanation of NVC)
(please check out the material url for an insight in the card game GROK)

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
100

Beware Agile is manipulating you!!!

Introduction to the behavioral economy, its applications in the Agile practices & how that can be fun

Pierre Hervouet

Dear all you are not a rational device, hopefully agile is playing on our irrationality (for the best?)
Let’s play some quizzes, and discover some psychological surveys conducted by major psychologists, that illustrate how we can be “predictability irrational”. You will get some insights about how Agile is playing with it, how the agile practices are activating our irrational behaviors.

Goal of the session: Discover psychological experiments are supporting the Agile approaches, understand & experimentation our limitations in the process thinking
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo,Bram, Philippe, Joke, Ellen, Vicent
Expected experience: no experience required
Session Type: 30 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation on Slideshare

Dear all you are not a rational device, hopefully agile is playing on our irrationality (for the best?)
Let’s play some quizzes, and discover some psychological surveys conducted by major psychologists, that illustrate how we can be “predictability irrational”. You will get some insights about how Agile is playing with it, how the agile practices are activating our irrational behaviors.

The presentation is revised version of the lighting talk done in Agile France 2014

References
• Thinking, fast and slow: Daniel Kahneman
• Predictably irrational: Dan Ariely
• The (honest) truth about dishonesty: Dan Ariely
• Ant-fragile: Nicolas Nassib Taleb
• Nudge: Thaler & Sunstein

About Behavioral economic: Behavioral economic at the opposite of the neo-classical Theory doesn't think that the man is a rational economic actor always measuring the gains & Losses of each its actions.
It studies the effects of psychological, social, cognitive, and emotional factors on the economic decisions of individuals and institutions and the consequences for market prices, returns, and the resource allocation.
Daniel Kahneman got the Nobel prize of economic in 2002 for its work on this topics.

Project management as an economic process(agile or not) has a lot to learn from this discipline.
And Agile by putting the human in the center of the project can find scientifically support to its approaches

You will understand why:
- Planning poker, Persona, celebration, is working, how the involvement of the client in a project can be an advantages even if the project is not so performing...

Note: Material URL: Is in French :-(

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

TDD & Assembly Language

Come and see TDD practiced in extreme conditions

Emmanuel Gaillot

In this live coding session, we will show how to build a basic testing tool in assembly language (Intel 64 bits) and how to use it to program a non-trivial feature. This demonstration is intended to push the limits of what is considered doable with TDD. By doing so, we hope to make the audience realize that if it's possible to test-drive assembly code, it should be possible to test-drive anything.

Goal of the session: 1) to learn how to test-drive one's developments in contexts where there is no tool or framework; 2) to refresh one's knowledge in assembly language programming; 3) to get inspired doing live coding themselves and contribute honing the skills of the programmers' community; 4) to meet developers who enjoy exotic languages; 5) to have fun watching someone showing off
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Bram
Expected experience: Participants are expected to be programmers of intermediate to advanced level.
Session Type: 75 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: Code written during the session (on Github)

So this is how it goes. You go to an agile conference and you're told that if you use tool ABC and do X, Y, Z with it, you'll be successful and live happily ever after. But you suspect something is off: your daily work is more complicated than a trivial setup, no step is straightforward, and the devil is in the details. So you are tempted to say "Agile is cool, but it doesn't apply to my context." You're even more tempted to say so when you are a programmer, your failing means no software to run, and nobody really understands what you have to go through.

For once, we're going to address this problem - narrowing it to TDD.

In this live coding session, we will show how to build a basic testing tool in Assembly language (Intel 64 bits) and how to use it to program a non-trivial feature (actually, anything is virtually non-trivial in Assembly language). We'll rely on the use of Unix process return codes to display if our tests pass or not, and implement a red/green bar with Shell commands. It is a session for seasoned developers who are interested in seeing how one can do TDD, even in the most extreme conditions.

This demonstration is intended to push the limits of what is considered doable with TDD. By doing so, we hope to make the audience realize that if it's possible to test-drive assembly code, it should be possible to test-drive anything. This demonstration is not for the faint of heart : participants are expected to have some practical knowledge of the Unix system and of memory stack manipulation. On the other hand, life is not for the faint of heart either, so this is as good as it gets.

By running this session, we also hope to set an example. We hope that some people will find it cool to see some live coding in Assembly and get inspired to do so themselves at home or at other conferences - and thus, contribute to hone the skills of the programmers' community.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Back to program

max
25

Palace of VSM Mirrors

Bart Oste & Nick Oostvogels

A Value Stream Map shows you the bottlenecks in your development process and it visualise the waste that is hindering you in delivering software. Building a VSM with the team is like looking in a mirror, it confronts you with reality.

But what if you put a few teams together and let them build their VSM simultaneously? It would be like putting your process in a palace of VSM mirrors. It will not only show your bottlenecks and waste, but also missing steps, further improvements and optimisations from the teams around you, it will trigger new ideas,...

Goal of the session: exchange knowledge on software development processes and provide you a fun and inspiring way to visualise value streams in your organisation.
Intended audience: Everybody with a strong need to visualise and improve his/her process
Expected experience: no experience required
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation (32 MB PDF)

A Value Stream Map shows you the bottlenecks in your development process and it visualise the waste that is hindering you in delivering software. Building a VSM with the team is like looking in a mirror, it confronts you with reality.

But what if you put a few teams together and let them build their VSM simultaneously? It would be like putting your process in a palace of VSM mirrors. It will not only show your bottlenecks and waste, but also missing steps, further improvements and optimisations from the teams around you, it will trigger new ideas,...

The goal of this session is to learn how to build a current and future VSM with multiple teams together. There's no need to prepare upfront as during the session we will guide you in building the VSM.
The session will be facilitated by Nick Oostvogels and Bart Oste, both Agile coach at VRT and used this technique for their teams.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
40

Working With People You Can't Stand

Get the best out of the difficult people around you.

Nicole Belilos

Wouldn’t you like to learn how to work well with the difficult people around you?

In this active session you will learn to spot the 10 most common unwanted behaviors. You will understand why difficult people act the way they do. And you will get the opportunity to discover and try out some new tactics to respond effectively to their behavior. After this session, you will be able to get the best out of people at their worst!

The session will be a mix of lecture, group discussions, role playing and reflection.

Goal of the session: - Become aware of your personal allergies towards certain types of people- Understand why they behave the way they do- Get practical ideas as to how to deal with these people and get the best out of them- Become aware of your own behaviors that other people might not like
Intended audience: Everybody can join. We all know someone we can’t stand.
Expected experience: No special knowledge required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

We all prefer Individuals and Interactions over Processes and Tools.
We also prefer some individuals over other individuals.
And some people we simply... can't stand.

In our daily lives, we encounter people that act in ways we don’t like: whiny people, bullying people, people who think they know it all, people who say nothing at all... At best, our interactions with them are not very successful. At worst, they escalate into conflicts.

Wouldn’t you like to learn how to deal with the difficult people around you?

In this active session you will learn to spot the 10 most common unwanted behaviors. You will understand why difficult people act the way they do. And you will get the opportunity to discover and try out some new tactics to respond effectively to their behavior. After this session, you will be able to get the best out of people at their worst!

The session will be a mix of lecture, group discussions, role playing and reflection.

This session is based on the book 'Dealing With People You Can't Stand' by Dr. Rick Brinkman and Dr. Rick Kirchner.
More information on the book can be found here: http://rickbrinkman.com/store/books/dpcs.shtml

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
40

Product Backlog manifestation - from zero to something

Facilitating the creation of backlogs

Per M. Beining

"In the beginning there was nothing..."
So how do you get from scratch and into something that can be considered good enough to call a Product Backlog.

This session will take the participants through my mental model for Facilitation along with some the techniques I've found most valuable in my work helping teams, projects and organisations creating their initial Product Backlog.

2nd part of the session is focussed on the experience of the session participants: What Techniques do you use?

Goal of the session: Getting a few new ideas to how to facilitate the creation of a backlog from scratch
Intended audience: Marieke, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Everyone
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

The white canvas or the blank piece of paper is sometimes the Artists' worst fear. It blocks for getting the masterpiece started.
Same thing sometimes is true about Product Backlogs: how do we manifest an initial Product Backlog that we can work on for months or years.

This session will take the participants through my mental model for Facilitation along with some of the techniques I've found most valuable in my work helping teams, projects and organisations creating their initial Product Backlog.

2nd part of the session is focussed on the experience of the session participants: What Techniques do you use?

Expected outcome of the session is
...for new comers to the field of creating a Backlog from Scratch, to go back home with a few techniques that they could use for creating their first initial backlog.
...for more experiences Backlog creaters - through sharing their experience - to get new ideas and perhaps peer-confirmation on their current ways of creating backlogs

As it's different people in different organizations that creates backlogs and maintains them - the audience could be anyone: Project Managers, Product Owners, Product Managers, Lead Developers etc

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
30

Anyone can write concurrent code using Test Driven Design? Inconceivable!

Experience TDD and concurrent programming from inside a Parallel Human Computer

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe & Thien Que Nguyen

Being able to work on concurrent problems and systems is becoming mandatory for everyone in IT. But it looks insanely hard and our familiar tools (like TDD) don't seem to work.

Come and play part of our Parallel Human Computer. We'll "program" (teach) you using TDD. Once programmed, you'll solve a complicated puzzle easily by collaborating with the other participants "inside" the computer.

You'll see that it's not so hard and really good fun! And maybe you'll start to think differently about systems.

No computers or programming experience required!

Goal of the session: Understand concurrent systems problems and solutions. Learn how you can apply Test Driven Design to concurrent code. Experience how a parallel computer works and is programmed. Discover how simple rules and collaboration can solve complicated problems
Intended audience: Anybody. This session is relevant to developers, testers and architects and everybody who's interested in organisation, communication, emergent behaviour, solving puzzles, simulations, acting and playing.
Expected experience: Everybody can play. No programming experience required.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Session materials and resources

The world around us is concurrent: lots of things happen at the same time all the time. We need to be able to work with concurrent systems to correctly understand and model the world, to create high-performance and scalable systems, to create responsive applications or to make good use of our increasingly multi-core computers. And it's a useful technique to design teams and organisations around simple rules, communication and collaboration.

But, surely, writing concurrent programs using Test Driven Design is inconceivable, because:

  • It's insanely hard, only accessible to genius uber-nerds
  • You can only do it well with exotic and esoteric programming languages
  • You can't unit test concurrent programs
  • A fortiori, you can't apply Test-Driven Design (TDD) on concurrent applications
  • It's painstaking and boring work
  • Normal people like me can't understand it

On the contrary! It's easy and fun. You don't even have to know anything about programming to play a part in our "Communicating Smart People" simulation!

Our company "Communicating Smart People" (CSP inc) has just created a Parallel Human Computer to solve puzzles. We'd like for you to become one of the parts of this computer. We will use Test Driven Design to teach you how to perform simple tasks and how to communicate with the other players inside the computer.

By the end of the session you'll have solved a complicated puzzle, by each working on a small and simple part of the problem.

After the simulation, we'll explain what you experienced with some simple theory and tools you can apply immediately.

You don't need programming experience or a computer. We just need a few people who want to play and learn.

---

"Programming concurrent systems with non-programmers and without computers? Inconceivable!"

"You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means"

---

If you feel the urge to program this on a real computer after the session, let us know. We have a number of implementations in different programming languages on GitHub and we're looking for more implementations.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
24
Laptop

Coding a Game from Examples

A Dojo

Wim Heemskerk & Martin van Dijken

This coding dojo will let you experience Behaviour Driven Development and Specification by Example from a coding perspective; we’ll practice coding outside in, driven by examples. Warning: this just might make you like TDD.

Goal of the session: How to give direction to day to day development working from the outside in.
Intended audience: Members of agile development teams, mainly coders. Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: We will be coding, which we'll prepare for Java. Please bring a laptop with IDE.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

This coding dojo will let you experience Behaviour Driven Development and Specification by Example from a coding perspective. We will hand out a set of properly-drafted scenarios with the rules to a small game. Using these scenarios, you will experience what it feels like to work inwards driven by acceptance tests. You will walk away from this dojo knowing what (A)TDD from the outside in feels like. Warning: this just might make you like TDD.

It is hard to get up to speed with Behaviour Driven Development, although the concepts are explained easily enough. To do it right, you have to learn how to interview your business users, choose your examples, properly write them up as scenarios, choose a framework, and only when you’ve got all that covered, you get to code to your scenarios. For this dojo we’ll be sure to arrange all these preparations for you, so you can hit the ground coding.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
40

Agile Coaching for 300 people, let's run an Agile Team Building!

Facilitating the Agile transition in an organization

Anais Victor

The Agile transition for a whole company is a real challenge, and we are always looking to involve teams in agile projects to coach them... but agile is mainly about values, so what about organizing an agile team building?!

Goal of the session: Running an Agile Transition over the whole company by gamification
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Starting an agile transition in Vietnam 2 years ago, I faced to the limits of the culture... after exploring many ideas, fails, success, and knowing which are the limits, the challenge is even bigger as the next step to run the transition over the whole company.

We are taking about 300 people... and today the transition is quite successful among IT teams (40 people). But why should we stop there? Why should agile be only applicable to IT teams?

In the first part (short intro) of this session, I will take the opportunity to share about the specific experience about Agile in Vietnam where there is a strong barrier due to the culture but also positive strenghths!

It's mainly about how I learn through the culture how to adapt the way I was coaching teams & involved them through Agile values & methods.

In the second part (80%), I'll share my own experience of the challenge to run a transition for 300 people, by organizing an annual team building in an Agile way following this concept :

# The team building is a Product
# This product will be a panel of activities to learn about agile concepts
# 300 people will be organized in agile teams to deliver this product
# story map experience, epics, user stories, sprints, tests, demo, and releases

Today (August), the product backlog has been initialized with 18 Epics from transportation, accomodation to breakfast, lunch, diner, games, open space, karaoke party... to be detailed into user stories and acceptance criteria (vegeterian meals, english and vietnamese songs for the karaoke...)

Finally, you will have the chance to have an open & sincere retrospective,as the team building will be delivered early October...

From fails to success, I'll share with you this challenge to coach 300 people to agile values within 2 days. And good tips to plan a wedding, a party, holidays... in an agile way!


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max
50

Passion for Agile education

The secrets to let talent blossom

Ward Bergmans & Arno Delhij

Who remembers what it was like at High School? And why learning wasn’t so much fun at all? And you know why? Because the teacher told you what to do and how to do it, no arguing allowed!

Who had ever thought that education would learn from the IT guys, and what lessons can be learned from Scrum by teachers? If anyone in particular can explain how and why Scrum in education works than it is the students themselves.

After this interactive session you will have gained first hand insight from the students how eduScrum evolved, better understand why and how it works and beyond doubt will never look the same at education.

Goal of the session: Create a sense of curiosity and broaden the knowledge of how to apply Scrum in education
Intended audience: Scrum adventurous
Expected experience: Basic knowledge of Scrum
Session Type: 150 min discovery session

Since a few years Scrum is used to educate students (teens and adults), this has evolved to the eduScrum framework.
With eduScrum students work together in an energetic, targeted, effective and efficient way.
With eduScrum students are stimulated to develop into a valuable member of a team.
eduScrum ascertains a mind-set that aims for constant improvement.
eduScrum is a framework for a cocreative process and supporting.

This new way of education has lead to remarkable results but most of all motivated students that take ownership of their learning process. Once you have seen this live, you’re overwhelmed and understand why this approach has such a potential. Needles to say that this boosted our interest and we decided to devote a fair amount of time and energy to support this fantastic and radical innovation in education.

So, together with the help of some special friends, we’ve created a session about eduScrum that will bring you all the secrets you want to know!
In the true spirit of the eXPerience Days we’ve arranged a group of high school students and teachers to share their experiences with you!


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Pixar storytelling to Infinity and Beyond!

Learn how to create great visual stories by using the Pixar design process

Ron Eringa & Laurens Bonnema

As Agile change managers we all have great stories to tell.
If you want to make a story stick, visualizing it is a very good idea!
One of Pixar's motto's is : "Show, don't tell".
In this session we will discover how we can tell stories by incrementally visualizing them in a graphical way.

Goal of the session: Discover what aspects will make your stories stick and how to visualize them. Then we will learn by using some of these techniques
Intended audience: Everyone who wants to learn how to tell great stories
Expected experience: None required. Just bring great stories
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

In this interactive session we will learn how Pixar creates great stories, by using an incremental design process, where they:

  • Break down the story in smaller parts
  • Remove less critical details and focus on the important ones
  • Build a minimal viable product that is improved incrementally

After sharing some of the aspects of the Pixar design process (storyboarding, colorscripting, approximation), we will create some visual stories ourselves. As part of this process Sketchnoting can be used as well.
This session is mix of discovering some of Pixar's design techniques, sharing great stories & learn by doing.

Last but not least we will bring some of our own examples and share them with you.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
16

Entangling artefacts

Learn how to evolve your tools to embody continuous improvement.

Matti Schneider

You know how to use artefacts to visualize progress. But do you know how to design artefacts to accelerate it?

Goal of the session: Finding how to design artefacts that support improvement
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Ellen
Expected experience: Ha-level in agility concepts
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation on Speakerdeck

When developing in an agile fashion, we use artefacts every day as a support for communication and production, to measure and learn. Even though we prefer to think about interactions rather than tools, the latter end up mediating the former.

Rather than denying this aspect, I will put forward a proposal on how we can use it to our advantage, and we'll explore it together.

Based on 18 months of experiments in a startup and analysis through cognitive anthropology and system models, we'll see how the system of production can be entangled with the artefacts that represent it. You will thus be presented both with an abstract definition of what makes an artefact powerful enough to embody continuous improvement; and concrete, tested examples of how to do it, such as the a Guide Board, or the set of operations you can apply to a Task Board for it to evolve.

This will be the basis for a research workshop where we'll find out the limitations of this approach by applying it to your own artefacts.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
20

Exploring your courage and vulnerability

How to get better at your job

Gitte Klitgaard

Find your own courage by exploring it in this session.

Goal of the session: Know what courage means and have tools to explore their own courage
Intended audience: jan, marieke, leo, bram, georges, vincent,joke, hank, ellen
Expected experience: Nope
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Engange in a workshop where we explore the aspects of courage and vulnerability.
There is a reason that courage was one of the original XP values, and is one of the values in scrum. To work with agile you need to be brave.

What is courage? Why do we need it? How will it help us be better at our jobs? What does vulnerability have to do with courage?

I have worked with this for several years and even have a tattoo with "Be Brave", so I will use examples of my journey in this workshop. The workshop will be a mixture of exercises, examples and theory.

We will explore together and find ways to be brave that we can go home and apply in our jobs.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Olivier Costa

Olivier Costa

Website: http://www.aegisoft.be

Olivier Costa

is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns Aikido from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a Japanese grand-master and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.
www.WareNatuur.be

He has always been involved in the whole software development cycle. From (business) idea over development & testing until release, follow up (business satisfaction) and maintenance. While writing code primarily in C#, he became an Agile Coach (for very diverse teams writing in very diverse languages) in search of teams he wants to work in.

My top 2 favorite books are:


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Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?
Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?
Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Markku Åhman

I have been developing software for over 20 years on distributed, multi-tasking, embedded real-time systems, and got a master's degree in Computer Science. The last some five years, I have also been a scrum master to a small team of my colleagues.


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Guillaume Duquesnay

Guillaume Duquesnay

Website: http://agileapreslecole.fr

Twitter: @duquesnay

Guillaume is a jack of all trade and a passionate storyteller.
He relentlessly crosses his various experiences, from roleplaying game to non profit organization involvement, or professionally as a coder, consultant or coach. Always on new stuff, challenging his beliefs, he makes connections, trying to see core principles through things and refining his practices.
As a playful mind and a fine observer of small meaningful details, he is not shy when it comes to getting offbeat or wild during his sessions when he wants to share his thoughts.


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Olivier Azeau

Olivier Azeau

Website: http://agilitateur.azeau.com/

Twitter: @oaz

Software craftsman
Team lead at Varian Medical Systems
Co-founder of the agile community in Toulouse, France


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Dajo Breddels


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Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten is an experienced Agile/Scrum coach, practicing Scrum since 2006.
Paul is a recovering Prince II practitioner, who once was a pretty bad programmer.

Paul has trained hundreds of people on Agile/Scrum and related topics and regularly presents to various audiences. Paul is a Scrum.org certified Scrum trainer.

Having introduced Scrum in multiple organizations, Paul knows about the pitfalls along the way and the hard work required. More importantly, Paul knows the rewards when you persevere.
He helps organizations move towards more business agility, and effective product development.


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Rob van Lanen

Rob van Lanen

Website: http://www.scrum.nl

Twitter: @robvanlanen

Having spent over ten years in software development, I have seen many different organizations and teams. When I started reading about Agile, I got hooked. I started implementing Scrum and eXtreme Programming practices in 2005 and I never went back to traditional software development.

I have seen and participated in traditional software development. Waterfall teams sliding through the mud and in the end not delivering at all. I have seen Agile gone wrong and even participated in the demise of these projects. However, I learned a lot from these experiences. I have also participated in successful Scrum teams and loved it. I have seen teams work hard to overcome all impediments that the implementation of Scrum made clear to them.

After several years of experience as Developer, Scrum Master, Product Owner and Development Manager, I want to share my lessons with the community. It is my passion to teach the agile mindset and help teams to build great products that end-users love. Guiding dedicated professionals to reach this goal is what makes me get up in the morning.

You can read more about Rob at www.scrum.nl.


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Pierre Hervouet

Website: https://www.facebook.com/agilelebanon

Twitter: @agilelebanon

Pierre Hervouet is the founder of Agile Lebanon and has been an active promoter of agile methodologies since 2009.
He has over 25 years of professional experience, where he addressed all dimensions of the software industry; from business analysis to development, implementation and project management, as well as, sales and marketing.
He worked in Paris, and then moved to Lebanon 2001, where he worked at Khatib & Alami, one of the major Lebanese engineering company. He held the post of manager of the Business Performance & Business Development departments until July 2012.
It is after the XP days 2009 in Paris, that he started his journey in Agile.
Since then, he has implemented Agile methodologies with his 2 teams at K&A, and later, as a consultant in different Lebanese companies.


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Emmanuel Gaillot

Emmanuel works as a team coach, (extreme) programmer, facilitator, trainer and systems jiggler. For the last 10 years he has been helping software makers to be better at, prouder of, and happier about the work they produce.

A regular speaker at many conferences on Agility, Emmanuel also co-organizes the annual Agile Open France conference. He is one of the founder (and still assiduous member) of the Coding Dojo in Paris. Emmanuel works in Paris at /ut7, a co-operated business he learns to hack with his fellow colleagues. He currently focuses his energy and passion on learning and teaching exotic languages, on shaping self-organizing structures and setting up co-learning spaces.


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Bart Oste

Bart Oste

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @bartoste

Bart Oste is an enthusiastic, motivating and communicative agilist with a constant drive to find improvements in the world around him.

After being Product Owner in a SAFe release train for 3 years, he now coaches organisations to get the best out of their teams by adopting Scrum, SAFe and other Agile best practices. Bart helps teams to self-organise and to increase their cooperation and communication. He guides organisations on their Agile journey.

Besides his coaching activities, Bart enjoys to be a trainer regularly and likes to facilitate Agile sessions.


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Nick Oostvogels

Nick Oostvogels

Website: http://www.skycoach.be

Twitter: @nickoostvogels


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Nicole Belilos

Twitter: @nicolebelilos

Nicole Belilos is an Agile coach and trainer, based in The Netherlands, where she helps organizations, teams and individuals transition to Agile. She is an experienced change agent and has strong communicative and personal skills.

Nicole’s hobbies are public speaking, acting and improvisation. She likes to be on stage, and has played in several amateur productions. With her improvisation games, Nicole combines her hobby with her passion for Agile and learning.


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Per M. Beining

Per M. Beining

Website: https://www.youtube.com/user/perbeining

Twitter: @perbeining

Per is part of the team behind one of Denmarks leading company within the field of Agilily: Ugilic (www.ugilic.dk).

Per's key skills are Agile project leadership and mentoring in IT environments. Working together with developers, business sponsors and management, he helps organizations implement Agile while considering existing culture, processes and governance (including PMO), and the organization's Agile maturity.
Educating and training people and organisations in how to apply Agile and Scrum is also close to his heart. And how to create and work with requirements is one of his current main focus areas.

Per is a DSDM Certified APL Practitioner and Certified Scrum Master and Product Owner. He has many years experience using traditional approaches to project management and systems development, and is a Certified Prince2 Practitioner, Certified IPMA Level C project leader, and Certified ITIL Foundation Level practitioner.

Per started his career as a software developer (perl, java and HTML). He has a Bachelor of Science degree from Copenhagen Business School, and has solid experience in telecommunications, media, transportation & logistics, finance/banking, and the military.

Write to Per at per@ugilic.dk or call +45 4030 8307.


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Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Website: http://blog.nayima.be

Twitter: @pascalvc

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe is a consultant based in Brussels who tries to solve more problems than he creates. To do this, he uses Agile, Lean, Theory of Constraints and Systems Thinking techniques.

He’s one of the founders of the Belgian XP group and one of the organizers of XP Days Benelux. One day he and Vera Peeters invented the “XP Game“, because they couldn’t explain XP to their team and customers. They’ve learned that games are an ideal way to learn. Since then he tries to transform work into play…


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Wim Heemskerk

Wim Heemskerk

Website: http://wimheemskerk.com

Twitter: @WimHeemskerk

Wim Heemskerk helps teams to be agile in their practices. He is an Agilist, a software craftsman, and a Stoosian. As a hands-on change agent, he stimulates the alignment of process, technology and organisation. Wim connects the dots to translate complementary models and their principles to day to day actions. He works to create lasting change, the kind people say they created and wanted themselves. He supports others on their quests for agility, leadership, great software and test automation that actually pays off.


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Martin van Dijken

Martin van Dijken

Twitter: @sunsear

Software developer, agilist, maximizer, builder, freelancer.

My values have always centered around getting the greatest result out of the hours I spend working. Starting as a junior software developer, I was always interested in technologies that helped me and my team increase our output. During my long career as a developer, I learned more and more that the focus should first be on building the right thing. The way to achieve that is through interaction with the people around us meaning users, other developers, business owners, infrastructure teams etc. After leading and guiding the teams I was working in as a developer and Scrummaster, I'm now helping other teams as an agile coach.


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Anais Victor

Anais Victor

Twitter: @anaisvicto

Anaïs, Engagement Leader working in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam since 2012

When I arrived in Vietnam, I was supposed to run an Agile transition with my project teams...

But I was not convinced by Agile at all, as my first steps in agile was : an incomprehensible discussion about scrum & 4 weeks of remote intensive agile coaching by skype... during lunch time

Hopefully I attended my first Agile Tour 2012 in Saigon, and I met few agile lovers who convinced me about the benefits of Agile. Then, I experienced it!

Today, I know that the road is very long to run an agile transition but I'm satisfied about the results and even better in Vietnam as the culture/education can be a strong barrier.

It's why I decided this year to join the Agile Vietnam Board in order to contribute to spread Agile in Vietnam. Fails after fails, success after success, it's time to share about our experiences!


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Ward Bergmans

Ward Bergmans

Website: http://nl.linkedin.com/in/wardbergmans

Twitter: @wardbergmans

Ward works as an independent Agile Coach. He has 10 years experience with Agile and Scrum and is the founder of the Agile Government Platform in the Netherlands. During an agile coaching assignment at a large government organisation (The Council for the Judiciary) he worked together with Arno. There they found out that the both had (and still have!) a keen interest in education.

The first time Ward learned about eduScrum he had a conversation with students who used eduScrum. The happiness that radiated from these teenagers while talking about their school and the results it brought to them, really struck Ward in his heart. Ward immediately became a Friend of eduScrum.


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Arno Delhij

Arno Delhij

Website: http://nl.linkedin.com/pub/arno-delhij/6/41b/bb1/

Twitter: @arnodelhij

Agile Philosopher and Agile by Nature that's how best to describe Arno. Although IT has boosted Agility Arno is a firm believer that Agile is the paradigm for the next century, in all possible fields. Agile is a way to approach problems and should focus on finding root-cause solutions rather than trying to cover up symptoms. Having experienced all possible forms of education and finding that none of them really embrace discovering the full potential of human beings together with his experience as an Agile Coach it was only a 'natural' step to become involved in eduScrum (Agile education). Together with Rini van Solingen and Willy Wijnands he wrote the eduScurm guide, a framework for Agile Education. With his former colleague Ward they discovered what Scrum could learn from eduScrum and started working on an analysis and presentation - based on their findings. It's his passion to facilitate the discovery of the full potential of human beings. His agile philosophy goes further than his work only. In his free-time he dedicates his time training his sheep dogs in an Agile way, by trial and error and with a lot of love and passion they learn a lot of one another ;-)


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Ron Eringa

Ron Eringa

Twitter: @roneringa

In his daily job Ron Eringa is an Agile coach, working at Prowareness.
Since he started his career in 2000 he has encountered lots of softare projects, struggling with traditional development methodologies, having forgotten how beautifull it is and how creative it can be to develop software.
However in 2004 he also encountered projects working with Scrum & Agile and he saw that teams rediscovered that original spark that made them become good software developers.

In the last few years Ron has been providing Agile workshops and coaching Agile teams while also participating as a Scrum master, Product Owner and Developer himself. Ron is an enthousiastic speaker, who enjoys to share knowledge and work with empowered teams.

In his private life, Ron is a husband and father of 2 daughters. His hobbies are running, skiing, photography and reading.


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Laurens Bonnema

Laurens Bonnema

Website: http://blog.xebia.com/author/lbonnema/

Twitter: @laurensbonnema

Laurens is an Agile Management Consultant and an expert in sustainably aligning business and IT to improve the results of IT projects. He has a strong background in IT with experience in almost every role. Laurens takes great pride in his work, and it shows in the recommendations he has received over the years.

As a Certified Scrum Master, Certified Scrum Product Owner, Certified Agile Master, and PRINCE2 Practitioner, he strives to merge classic and Agile management in the conviction that it is the future of professional management.

Laurens is a professional enthusiast when it comes to hand lettering, sketchnoting, graphic recording, podcasting, and writing. He has tried to attain work-life balance only to discover work-life swirling suits him better.

Laurens is fluent in Dutch, English, and Spanish, and speaks passable French and German.

He lives in Dordrecht, The Netherlands, with his wife Nienke Blauw and son Mark.


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Matti Schneider

Matti Schneider

Website: http://mattischneider.fr

Twitter: @matti_sg

Transdisciplinary engineer.
Building software, studying humans, designing interactions, thinking society.


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Gitte Klitgaard

Twitter: @nativewired

Gitte Klitgaard is an Agile Coach, Pirate, Dragon Lady, Hugger, friend, and much more. She is agile; live it and love it. She has taken the oath of non-allegiance. Gitte has more than 10 years experience in different aspects of software development and is currently working with Agile and people. She wants to change the world by helping people in their work life. She is a geek and very passionate about a lot of stuff :)


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions