Thursday November 28th

Room 16

Room 17

Room 18

Room 1

Room 2

7:00

8:00

Registration and Coffee

9:00

Opening Plenary

9:30

 Agile the Boardgame

Dajo Breddels

Max: 100 

Session materials

 Sketchnoting FTW!

Laurens Bonnema &
Serge Beaumont


Presentation

 TDD from the outside in with Rails

Michel Grootjans

Max: 15 

 Distributed Agile; The do's and dont's based on a real life example

Joost Mulders &
Andriy Korpan


Presentation


 Using Scrum in daily business

Linda Dorlandt &
Mirna den Blanken

 Scenarios Applied

Joost Jonker &
Marcel Blok

Max: 40 

Presentation, references and games

10:45

Coffee Break

11:15

 Learn and create your own game

Alexandre Boutin

Max: 16 

 Agile Cross-Borders

Hoang-Anh PHAN &
Anais Victor

Max: 25 

TDD from the outside in with Rails

CONTINUED

 Kill all projects

Paul Kuijten

Max: 30 

Presentation

 Data driven team decisions @ SpilGames

Attila Nyeste


Presentation

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Opening Plenary

14:00

 Rocket to Mars (v2) - the sprint planning game

Damien THOUVENIN &
Pierrick Revol

Max: 42 

 Master & Commander

Ole Jepsen

Max: 40 

 Refactoring to Hexagonal Rails

Rob Westgeest &
Lars Vonk

Computer
Max: 28 

 Let's BDD the DOM Manipulation

Frans Overbeek

Computer
Max: 20 

Presentation

 Play Rhetoric: it's all a manner of speaking

Astrid Claessen

Max: 32 

Session blog

15:15

Coffee Break

15:45

Rocket to Mars (v2) - the sprint planning game

CONTINUED

Master & Commander

CONTINUED

Refactoring to Hexagonal Rails

CONTINUED

Let's BDD the DOM Manipulation

CONTINUED

Play Rhetoric: it's all a manner of speaking

CONTINUED

17:15

Closing Plenary

18:00

Drinks offered by iLean

19:00

Dinner with drinks offered by Rally

20:30

 Za Zen - session

Olivier Costa &
Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 10 

21:00

 Aikido evening session

Olivier Costa &
Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 10 

22:00

 Za Zen - session 2

Olivier Costa &
Thien Que Nguyen

Max: 10 

Friday November 29th

Room 16

Room 17

Room 18

Room 1

Room 2

7:00

8:00

Registration and Coffee

9:00

Opening Plenary

9:30

 Extreme Team Performance Gaming

Ron Eringa &
Edwin de Werk

Max: 30 

 DevOps Games

Remi-Armand Collaris &
Jan-Sake Kruis

Max: 36 

Presentation, movies and downloads: see the ScrumUP blog

 Refactoring legacy code driven by tests

Luca Minudel &
Saleem Siddiqui

Computer
Max: 20 

The github repo with code for the exercises.

 Brutal Refactoring Game

Adi Bolboaca &
Erik Talboom

Computer
Max: 20 

Presentation

 Scaling the Product Owner role

Timo Punkka

Max: 25 

10:45

Coffee Break

11:15

Extreme Team Performance Gaming

CONTINUED

DevOps Games

CONTINUED

Refactoring legacy code driven by tests

CONTINUED

Brutal Refactoring Game

CONTINUED

 The lonely analyst in an agile team

Thien Que Nguyen &
Merlijn van Minderhout

Max: 30 

Workshop outputs

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Opening Plenary

14:00

 The Neuroscience of Agile Leadership

Jenni Jepsen

Max: 40 

 Get out of SCRUM, get into KANBAN

Sandra Warmolts

Max: 30 

Presentation

 Getting target-processor-specific legacy code under testing in PC

Jani Söderström &
Ron Ahonen

 Ignore the cost accountants at your peril, because they won’t ignore you

Pierre Hervouet &
Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Max: 30 

Background information

 Walt Disney creativity technique

Jan De Baere

15:15

Coffee Break

15:45

 Succeeding with Agile; how to change a company’s DNA

Joost Mulders &
Astrid Claessen

Max: 30 

Session materials

 Fail early, fail often

Marc Evers &
Hans Kalle

Max: 30 

Slides and handout

 The Server That Goes Ping!

Emmanuel Gaillot &
François de Metz

 The Art of Being Wrong

Laurent Bossavit

 The power of habit

Yves Hanoulle


Slides

17:15

Closing Plenary

18:00

Closing Drinks



Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro's and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement
Other

Session descriptions

Distributed Agile; The do's and dont's based on a real life example

Joost Mulders & Andriy Korpan

Many companies have tried or are working with distributed development teams.

During this short presentation I would like to share my experience in using agile to succesfully integrate a near shore development team from Ukraine in our organization using Agile practices.

In 30 minutes you will get a full overview of the process we went through from the start until today and all the challenges we had and pitfalls we stepped into and how we have overcome them.

Goal of the session: The goal of this session is to give the participants an overview of implementing agile in distributed development teams based on the approach I took with Mproof (NL) and Symphony - Solutions (Ukraine).Learning goals from this session: Understand the challenges and pitfalls of implementing agile in distributed teams / organizations. Understand the pro's and cons* Understand what to do and what to avoid when introducing agile practices in a distributed environment.
Intended audience: Anybody interested in distributed agile.
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)
Materials: Presentation

Many companies have tried or are working with distributed development teams.

During this short presentation I would like to share my experience in using agile to succesfully integrate a near shore development team from Ukraine in our organization using Agile practices.

In this 30 minute presentation you will get a full overview of the process we went through from the start until today and all the challenges we had and pitfalls we stepped into and how we have overcome them.

The presentation is based on experience with a near shore development partner with which we have been working in distributed agile teams for over 3 years now.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
100

Agile the Boardgame

Dajo Breddels

Most people learn more from experiences, than from lectures or books. This is the reason why we developed Agile the Board Game. This cooperative board game allows you to experience Agile projects without spending months. We use this game to introduce people to Agile software development and let them play with different choices you have to make as a real Agile team. Choices like: length of iteration, composition of the team, prioritizing what to do and when to do which best practices. We find this game also useful to teach the impact of doing Agile software development to non-IT people. After attending this session you will be able to host your own games (attendees can download the game for free).

Goal of the session:
Expected experience: experienced
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Session materials

People learn to play the Agile the Board Game. It’s a cooperative game (playing against the system not against each other) where a team of 5 to 9 people have to finish a project as good as possible. The game itself is a resource based game like “Settlers of Catan” or “Lords of Waterdeep”. During the game the team has to make a lot of decisions, which are also faced by real scrum teams, like: who to hire, length of iteration, priority of product backlog, to invest in best practices and of course how to use your resources.
After you attended this session, you are able to host a game with Agile the Board Game at your own organization. And let people experience some of the core principles of agile during play. All attendees will get the link to download their own copy of the game.


Back to program

Sketchnoting FTW!

How to use Sketchnoting to improve communication and collaboration

Laurens Bonnema & Serge Beaumont

Sketchnoting is the use of pictures, word art and text to communicate ideas. Serge and Laurens will explain what sketchnoting is, why it's useful, how you can do it yourself, and will give you tips and tricks to get you going. They will also show how they have been using sketchnoting in their daily work, most notably Product Ownership (Serge) and envisioning by management (Laurens). And of course you will get the chance to have a go at it yourself!

Artistic skills totally not a requirement. You'll walk out of this session ready to take memorable notes that others will want to copy.

Goal of the session: The ability to express themselves with "not just words"
Intended audience: Anyone.
Expected experience: From zero to hero.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation

Sketchnoting is the use of pictures, word art and text to communicate ideas. Serge and Laurens will explain what sketchnoting is, why it's useful, how you can do it yourself, and will give you tips and tricks to get you going. They will also show how they have been using sketchnoting in their daily work, most notably Product Ownership (Serge) and envisioning by management (Laurens). And of course you will get the chance to have a go at it yourself!

Artistic skills totally not a requirement. You'll walk out of this session ready to take memorable notes that others will want to copy.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
15

TDD from the outside in with Rails

How to implement one feature at a time, from the outside in, using Rails

Michel Grootjans

Are you curious about implementing features from the outside-in? Are you new to Rails?

During this hands-on coding session, you will have the chance to experiment with both. We will be implementing a few simple features from the outside in, using RSpec.

Goal of the session: Get a taste for feature-driven development and for the ease of development in Rails
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram and Ellen make up the typical target audience and will benefit the most.
Expected experience: Some experience with web development will help. No experience in BDD, TDD or Rails is required.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

You've heard all the hype about Ruby and you've heard how great Rails is. Typical demos show you how you can generate an 'application' in a few minutes. In this workshop however, you will gain an understanding that most tutorials skip in favor of generation voodoo magic. We'll be building a small application from scratch in Ruby on Rails, driven by features and unit tests.

You will have the chance to get behind the keyboard and write a test or implement some code.

Why would you want to learn about Ruby or Rails?
Learning about new technologies and practices tends to generate new ideas in your current job.
While you don't have to agree with the whole concept, some ideas in the Rails stack are real nuggets.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Using Scrum in daily business

Setting change goals and getting there

Linda Dorlandt & Mirna den Blanken

Scrum is widely used in software development teams. The biggest challenge is to inspire the business to join the team and to get the team to understand the business.

We experienced that it helps to bring Scrum to the business. We got several business units to work with Scrum and Agile elements to change their way of working. Our question a year ago was: how to combine realizing change goals for a business unit and also continuing with daily business?

Visit our session, learn from our experience and let's develop more new improvements for the future!

Goal of the session: promote new ways of using Scrum
Intended audience: participants closer to the business than IT
Expected experience: novice
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)

Scrum is widely used in software development teams, the biggest challenge is to inspire the business to join the team and to get the team to understand the business.

We experienced that it helps to bring Scrum to the business. We got several business units to work with Scrum and Agile elements to change their way of working. Our question a year ago was: how to combine realizing change goals for a business unit and also continuing with daily business.

We used these elements of Scrum:
Get the whole team to focus on sprint work, one day per week.
Use a Scrum board to visualize remaining work and progress
Working with 1 to 3 stand-up's per day.
Get the product owner to work with the team
Sprint review meeting to demo to stakeholders
Sprint planning meeting to prioritize.

This is our experience:
Get the team to focus on the process of change
Get the team to own the changes they are making in their way off working.
Focus the team for a short period, so we can realize goals
Better knowledge sharing
Celebrating big and small results

Company context:
Collaboration! That is the idea from which FloraHolland originally developed. Growers started offering their products together to the dealers in one place. This made them stronger, and they obtained a better price for their flowers and plants.
Corporate departments where we have Scrum experience:
- Market and information: get the business unit to the next level
- Retail Services: starting a new business unit
- Facility Management: transition from 3 business on 3 locations to one business unit with a better service level for our customers; job profiles, etc.


Back to program

max
40

Scenarios Applied

A Catalyst for Conversation

Joost Jonker & Marcel Blok

Stop! Wait for a second. Let's talk first.
- What is this user story really about?
- Do you truly understand it?
- Is there a way we could make it smaller?
- What would deliver value to business, right now?
- Will you know when it is done?

These are excellent questions for continuing the conversation, during backlog grooming, sprint planning or basically any time during the sprint. Join this session to learn how scenarios will help you to get more of these and other questions in your team.

Goal of the session: Understand the value of scenarios to facilitate and improve conversation
Intended audience: Product Owners/Business Analysts (Joke), Scrum Masters/Coaches (Ellen), Developers, Testers and other team members (like Marieke), Project Managers (Georges) and Managers (Vincent)
Expected experience: No prerequisites
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation, references and games

In this workshop you will learn how you can use scenarios to facilitate and improve the conversation between business, stakeholders and development teams.

Scenarios describe the behaviour of the application in a format that is close to natural language and thus can be understood by business and other non-developers. Although scenarios can be automated - effectively turning them into executable specifications (i.e. tests) and a living documentation of the application - their value as a catalyst for conversation is often overlooked or misunderstood.

This workshop will therefore focus on the discovery and elaboration of scenarios in the context of agile software development. In a small team you will create a set of good quality scenarios for an application, while learning the needs of the business and customers as you go.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
16

Learn and create your own game

Learn how and why serious games work by making a working game

Alexandre Boutin

Teaching and learning Agility is hard because Agility is such a radically different approach. We know from other domains and from our experience as coaches and trainers that serious games work if you want to learn about, try out or experiment with new ideas.

We will see the levers that make games work and the principles of game creation. And then you can apply these to create a game about a subject you care about.

You'll learn how and why games work. And maybe you'll go home with a working game.

Goal of the session: Have funLearn what makes games workExperiment game creation
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Experienced in Agile
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Games free participants from certain constraints and their practical aspect facilitate memorizing of principles and techniques taught.

Sometimes skeptical beforehand, the vast majority of participants expressed even willingly taking pleasure in these games, what more?

After a short presentation of what make a game work and principal rules for creating a game, you will be invited in group to create some simple games with cards :

  • Choose an agile topic
  • Brainstorm on a game
  • Define rules
  • Test your game by playing with other groups (experiment)
  • Debrief and share ideas

By attending this session, you will get :

  • Some arguments for your boss to play game at work
  • A simple framework for game creation
  • Maybe a fantastic new game that the Agile community will love ... but it will depend on how you'll be creative :)

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
25

Agile Cross-Borders

Getting over the language barrier

Hoang-Anh PHAN & Anais Victor

Communication is the key of Agile, and language is the key of communication... let's find some skills to remove all impediments due to language barriers in multi-cultural work places growing in our world

Goal of the session: Experience remote agile through language barriers and learn about themselves to come out on top with fun
Intended audience: All
Expected experience: From beginners to seniors
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

"Individuals & Interactions", "Customer Collaboration"... "Yes, I know, we know... but I can't speak English, I don't feel comfortable to speak with our clients, I'm quite shy, I've a real complex with my pronunciation, i can't find my words...but every night I dream to be a great scrum master..."

So much frustration, that you already experienced, I guess? Have you ever meet someone to who you would like to talk so much but you couldn't because of a barrier language?

In agile off-shore projects, people always have to use English, a second language that they master at different levels: limited vocabulary, approximate pronunciation, etc.

The most obvious way to get over this is of course to take English lessons, but even intensive lessons take time while projects have started and need to be delivered. Furthermore your best talented developer is often the less skilled in English!

Therefore, I would like to make you think about the language barrier as a pretext, a subterfuge...As human beings, we all have members and senses, and the combination of both is widely enough to overcome language barriers.

Since I joined an improvisation troupe in Saïgon, I realized, that it's not only a personal hobby, but it can be of use for our agile teams. So the idea of this session is to experience through theatrical improvisation, the natural resources, that anyone can use when she/he has to face to these blocking issues.

It will be a chance to learn about improvisation, with a short improv' introduction and warm-up, then we will enjoy to play some specific categories, to get & find some skills in order to face to the communication impediments, which are disturbing us to lead agile values


Back to program

max
30

Kill all projects

Could getting rid of all projects be a good idea?

Paul Kuijten

I assert that we should kill all projects! As a recovering Prince II practitioner and IPMA C certified project manager, I have seen the good, the bad and the ugly. Let's look at the bad and the ugly. Then, let's look at what it takes to get to the good.

Goal of the session: Participants will walk out of the session with an understanding of how to do without projects in an organisation
Intended audience: All, but especially Georges and Vincent
Expected experience: Basic agile and project management knowledge
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation

In this session we will explore the harm that projects do.
My assertion is we can do without in software development, and we will explore this assertion together.

Exploration will take place guided by a number of areas that would need to be addressed in software development.
eg. quality, value, productivity, people, process.

We will be crowdsourcing ways of killing all projects.
NB This session will be 100% group effort, no content is delivered by facilitator. (except for the assertion and areas)

What are problems with organising the work in projects?

Can we come up with alternative ways?
Bring your ideas from XP, Lean, Scrum, DevOps, Kanban, Beyond budgeting, etc.

Jointly, we will glue it all together in a congruent overall picture.


Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Back to program

Data driven team decisions @ SpilGames

The benefit of involving agile teams with setting out KPIs, A/B tests in product development

Attila Nyeste

Have you ever led or worked with a team where vision, "common" goals were mainly owned by the management team and the team was expected to take ownership of execution plan despite of them having concerns or even disagreeing to them?

Let me take you on a journey where i'll explain how we've applied Data Driven Decision Making by using A/B testing as a practical example.

Goal of the session: Share experience, demonstrate how DDDM and A/B testing can help teams become more cross functional
Intended audience: scrum masters, dev. managers, BO/POs, developers
Expected experience: Medior, Senior
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Presentation

Have you ever led or worked with a team where vision, "common" goals were mainly owned by the management team and the team was expected to take ownership of execution plan despite of them having concerns or even disagreeing to them?

At SpilGames we truly believe in cross-functional, multidisciplinary teams. One of our first step towards becoming such was to introduce data driven decision making. It's helped the team a lot to:
- understand the product better
- understand our customers better
- take real ownership
- deliver real business value !!faster!!
- bridge the gaps among organizational, team, personal goals
- have more fun and collaborate better as a team

Let me take you on a journey where i'll explain how we've applied Data Driven Decision Making by using A/B testing as a practical example.


Back to program

max
42

Rocket to Mars (v2) - the sprint planning game

A game for the Scrum POs, their managers and the teams they work with

Damien THOUVENIN & Pierrick Revol

Your are a team in charge of life-critical software - part of a big program to build a rocket for the next mission to Mars.
You and your PO must make the best possible use of the 50 days left before the first test-launch.
Come play and impersonate Jane the architect, Nadia the electonics expert, David the systems tester, Omar the do-it-all guy or Steve the embedded code guru.
Form a team and choose a strategy: do in-depth analysis or start coding ? develop expertise or generalist skills ? refactor mercilessly or burn down more story points ?
Different teams use different strategies : we'll see who does better at the end of the game.
PS: no need for "real" coding or electronics competencies, we'll use dices !

Goal of the session: We expect participants to get a deeper understanding of the dynamics of Scrum and the teams to get better at the sprint planning game. We also hope they have fun !
Intended audience: Managers, product owner and agile teams (and their coach) : Ellen, Joke, Georges, Bram, Marieke and Leo will love it !
Expected experience: Participants must have at least basic working knowledge of Scrum.
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

While working as agile coachs, we found that many a team - and their Product Owner - believe that the team's unique job is to deliver more and more story points.
We consider this to be a complete misunderstanding of the relation between the team and the PO.

Thus we have built this game to let the PO and the team experiment with different strategies and learn exactly how much time not to spend on "production" tasks.

We issued a version 1 of the game last year and played in various Agile Tours. This has taught us where the game needed improvement and ... tada! we have release "Rocket to Mars, version 2".

Come play with us, in teams of 6 (1 PO and 5 team members).
We can manage up to 7 tables (i.e. 42 players, 3 sets in english and 4 sets in french).

The game is two hours + some time for the debrief

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
40

Master & Commander

Is good leadership bad leadership in disguise?

Ole Jepsen

Once upon a time, there was a captain of a battleship named Jack Aubrey. He controlled the HMS Surprise during the Napoleonic Wars. He was a great leader! Or was he? We’ll travel back in time, and see how Captain Jack Aubrey (played by Russell Crowe in the Hollywood film ”Master & Commander”) was leading his crew. We’ll analyze some critical decision-making on the 1805 battleship– and compare it to decision-making in companies in 2013. How far has leadership really evolved in 208 years? And we might even sing. ;-)

Goal of the session: After this session, participants will be able to differentiate between great leadership (that creates better people, and, thereby, better results) from leadership in disguise (where people essentially are still being told what to do - and end up thinking less for themselves).
Intended audience: Leaders, Line managers, Project leaders and others interested in leadership
Expected experience: Some years of experience or interest in leadership
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

Once upon a time, there was a captain of a battleship during the Napoleonic wars. Jack Aubrey was his name – and he controlled the HMS Surprise on her missions. He was a great leader! He was nice to his crew – and they respected him. The crew on HMS Surprise always knew what their Captain wanted from them. He was a great leader!!!

Hmmm… Or was he?

In this session, we’ll travel back in time, and see how Captain Jack Aubrey (played by Russell Crowe in the Hollywood film ”Master & Commander”) was leading his crew. We will analyze some critical decision-making on the battleship in 1805 – and compare it to decision-making in companies anno 2013. How far has leadership really evolved in 208 years?

Based on award-winning author David Marquet’s work (”Turn the Ship Around”), we will explore the subtle differences between leading people and telling people what to do – between taking control and giving control – and between being a leader and creating leaders.

And we might even sing during this session ;-)


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28

Portable computer

Refactoring to Hexagonal Rails

Refactoring your Rails Applications to the passive controller style

Rob Westgeest & Lars Vonk

You've heard the buzz about hexagonal architectures, but applying those ideas on your existing Rails code just seems like too big a mountain to climb.

Goal of the session: To learn to apply hexagonal architecture to rails applications.
Intended audience: Bram, Jan, Leo, Philippe
Expected experience: Some experience with software development, Rails or Ruby experience helps, but this will even be fun if you never have programmed in rails (or ruby) before.
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

You've heard the buzz about hexagonal architectures, but applying those ideas on your existing Rails code just seems like too big a mountain to climb.
Not any more! In this session, you'll take an example of a classic Rails controller and, guided by Rob and Lars, refactor it to the passive controller pattern. As we go, we'll peel all our business logic away from the framework and isolate it into plain old Ruby objects that are fast to test. We'll finish with a show and tell where we share and reflect on what we've learned during the session.

We have ideas and some practice, yet we do not know all the answers. We expect to learn from this session as well. We see this session as an experiential learning session. We'll capture and publish new ideas and insights.

Although you will get the most from this session if you are experienced in Rails (when you have felt the pain) but what you will learn in this session is more generic and applies to any MVC web framework you might have worked on before.

This session is originally Matt Wynne's. He presented this on GOTO; Amsterdam, where Lars and Rob hosted his session. As Matt cannot make it to XPDays, he kindly gave us permission to submit this for XPDays Benelux.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

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max
20

Portable computer

Let's BDD the DOM Manipulation

Hands on session about BDD-ing your DOM Manipulation

Frans Overbeek

Are you writing front end code in HTML, CSS and JavaScript? And would you like to know more or get another view on BDD-ing your work? This will be your hands on session.

In this session you will learn how to write tests from a dom manipulation focus and the benefits of doing this. The session is divided into a short presentation and a challenge, so you can try it yourself.

Goal of the session: Learn how to write tests from a dom manipulation focus.
Intended audience: Frontenders.
Expected experience: Must have experience is JavaScript. Nice to have is knowledge about a BDD JavaScript framework, e.g. Jasmine.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: Presentation

After two years Jasmine testing my frontend code, I came to the conclusion that:

Current JavaScript BDD frameworks have a poor support for DOM Manipulation and are focusing on JavaScript execution. Why, is DOM Manipulation not important, or is it hard to do?

  • As my frontend code is business logic free and DOM Manipulations is the main task. Let’s focus on DOM Manipulation and setup a DOM Manipulation SPY.

It is very easy to have test code explosions.
  • As we refactor code over time, let’s do that for test code as well and write reusable and chainable test cases.

The output of my test script is not readable for business at all.
  • As a frontend-er this must be solvable, so let’s enrich the living documentation.

Oh.. I’m writing CSS as well. None of my tests are paying any attention to this.
  • So let’s at least check the CSS coverage.

In this session you will learn how to write tests from a dom manipulation focus and the benefits of doing this. The session is divided into a short presentation, which will cover the topics as mentioned above, and a challenge, so you can try it yourself.

Already a pro in writing dom manipulating test scripts? Don’t worry, you will get the opportunity to give an elevator pitch about your awesome test code, just beat your colleagues in the challenge.

The hands on session is given as a challenge. First part is writing test scripts for a simple application, the application and the specs are already available, so you only have to concentrate on the actual test scripts. You can use either the pre defined and explained setup, Jasmine and some addons for making test dom manipulation easier. Or you can choose your own setup, e.g. Cucumber, Mocha, Selenium whatever you like. If possible prepare the setup before you start the challenge, this will save valuable time, what you will need to beat your colleagues.

For the second part changes and bugs are introduced to the application and the challenge will be:

  • Rewrite your test scripts for as many changes as possible.
  • Find as many bugs as possible.

The best 3 participants will be invited to give a short presentation about their test script. And the other participants can vote who will be the winner.

So are you in?


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32

Play Rhetoric: it's all a manner of speaking

Rhetoric is a board game that helps you improve your public speaking skills

Astrid Claessen

We know that for many people, the mere thought of public speaking can get their hearts pounding (I know it does for me, being an introvert also does not help in that regard).

We'd like to introduce you to a new board game called Rhetoric which will help you improve your communication skills. It is a simple, engaging and educational board game for four to eight people. Players step onto the stage (figuratively) and embark on a rhetorical journey during which they encounter different speech tasks. Don't worry, it's no improvisation class, you're allowed to take some time preparing your talks... and each speech only has to be 1 minute long. You can do that!

Goal of the session: - learn about different speech structures- become a better communicator- get our of your comfort zone- get more comfortable with improvising- receive feedback from other participants
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, George, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session
Materials: Session blog

With the greater adoption of Agile in the world (or.... Agile like....) even the "biggest nerd" will have to up the ante with regard to communication skills.

We know that for many people, the mere thought of public speaking can get their hearts pounding. We'd like to introduce you to a new board game called Rhetoric which will help you improve your communication skills. It is a simple, engaging and educational board game for four to eight people. Players step onto the stage (figuratively) and embark on a rhetorical journey during which they encounter different speech tasks. Don't worry, it's no improvisation class, you're allowed to take some time preparing your talks... and each speech only has to be 1 minute long. You can do that!

In each round, players roll the die and move their figures to the corresponding space where a one-minute speaking task awaits them.
The amount of people and the speed with which a group plays determines how many rounds can be played.

There are four types of tasks:

Topic - Players draw a card with a single word on it. They must speak about the topic.

Challenge – Players draw a card that has a challenging question or instruction. Challenges have been designed to stretch comfort zones!

Question – Any player can ask the speaker a spontaneous question on any topic.

Reflection – Players must share an insight or anecdote about public speaking with their fellow players. For example, they could share a personal public speaking experience, or suggest a presentation tip, or talk about a speaker whom they admire and why.

For Topics and Questions, players also spin one of two wheels that determine an aspect of delivery on which to focus or the manner in which the speech must be structured.

The game can be played competitively or non-competitively. If the former, each player receives a rating sheet. Throughout the game, everyone rates the speeches given by their fellow players. Players are thus competitors and judges at the same time.

You can order the game by mailing the creators: fmueck@gmail.com or john.s.zimmer@gmail.com

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
10

Za Zen - session

prepare for the evening

Olivier Costa & Thien Que Nguyen

Learn to sink down you mind

... and wash away old habits that you don't need anymore

Goal of the session: learn how to find your outdated patterns and unprogram them
Intended audience: anyone who dares to explore him/herself
Expected experience: no experience
Session Type: 30 min experiential learning session

What is it
We learn the 3 crucial aspects of what it takes to truly get to know oneself.

When we really know ourselves, we can completely employ ourselves to get where we want to go, with less effort and frustration.

When we don't know ourselves, we get distracted by habits that were once useful but now stick with us even though we do not need them anymore.

Za Zen is a technique polished by ages of practitioners to scrub away ancient habits and allow ourselves to create the mental space to reprogram new habits that help us today and tomorrow.

What do I need
cushion
If you happen to have a cushion to sit on easily, please bring it along. If not, don't worry, I'll bring some of my own. If you can 't sit comfortable on a cushion we have chairs as well.

clothing
Loosely fitting clothes will help you focus.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
10

Aikido evening session

get charged for a great nite and even greater 2nd xp day

Olivier Costa & Thien Que Nguyen

a safe context to experience human interaction

... and train the agile mindset

Goal of the session: discover how the warrior mindset is the foundation for agile thinking (at any level or environment)
Intended audience: anyone who dares to explore him/herself
Expected experience: its an intro - no experience (nor suppleness) required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

aiki tai shin
We start with preparing our body. We gently roll into the aikido session via yoga-like exercises (for more info on yoga -> see the morning sessions) .

tachi waza
Experience the conditions for effective leadership over oneself (and others).
We will gently exchange pushing and pulling forces and learn how we can use them safely to experiment.
Explore how physical principle apply to the mental domain (or agile mindset) as well.

clothing
Loosely fitting clothes make it easier to move.

audience
most people joining have no or low experience, so don't hold back - you're not alone :-)

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
10

Za Zen - session 2

prepare for the night

Olivier Costa & Thien Que Nguyen

Learn to sink down you mind

... and wash away old habits that you don't need anymore

Goal of the session: learn how to find your outdated patterns and unprogram them
Intended audience: anyone who dares to explore him/herself
Expected experience: no experience
Session Type: 30 min experiential learning session

What is it
We learn the 3 crucial aspects of what it takes to truly get to know oneself.

When we really know ourselves, we can completely employ ourselves to get where we want to go, with less effort and frustration.

When we don't know ourselves, we get distracted by habits that were once useful but now stick with us even though we do not need them anymore.

Za Zen is a technique polished by ages of practitioners to scrub away ancient habits and allow ourselves to create the mental space to reprogram new habits that help us today and tomorrow.

What do I need
cushion
If you happen to have a cushion to sit on easily, please bring it along. If not, don't worry, I'll bring some of my own. If you can 't sit comfortable on a cushion we have chairs as well.
clothes
Loosely fitting clothes will help you focus.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
30

Extreme Team Performance Gaming

How to facilitate constructive personal feedback sessions using card games

Ron Eringa & Edwin de Werk

Learn how to facilitate constructive personal feedback sessions with your team.
Discover if your self image is reflected by how your team members look at you.
Learn how to facilitate your team to self organize by giving them a tool for managing conflict, increasing team integrity & coordinate inter-team behavior.
Discover why communication sessions sometimes are difficult in certain situations and how you can improve communication within your team.

We will talk about how this approach is different with traditional feedback mechanisms and we will show you how to applying the game in your own environment.

Goal of the session: Discover each other strengths & weaknesses. Learn how to turn weaknesses into strengths.
Intended audience: Anyone who wants to improve their team synergy
Expected experience: None required. Anyone can join
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

Real self organizing team continuously improve their team performance.

One way to to improve team performance is to arrange personal feedback sessions on a regular basis. However, giving each other personal feedback is not always easy. You need to be constructive without bringing up too much emotions.

In this session we will explore a number of ways to facilitate constructive personal feedback sessions with your team. We will use card games that are based on the 'Core Quadrant' model by Daniel Ofman (http://www.scienceprogress.info/effectiveness/core-quadrant-ofman).

Participants will be sharing their personal core qualities, pitfalls, challenges & allergies in a card and game. We will discover how our pitfalls and allergies are related to our core qualities and this affects the behavior and effectiveness of a team.

Besides giving other team members feedback you will also learn how to introspect yourself. You will learn how a team can use this to grow and become more effective in their day to day work.

Since the theory behind the game is very easy to explain we have lots of time to actually play discuss and discover team dynamics. We can even analyze some conflict situations that participants bring to the stage and we will explain how we used the game in our own environment.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

max
36

DevOps Games

Motivating Development and Operations to Join Forces

Remi-Armand Collaris & Jan-Sake Kruis

According to Gartner DevOps is on the verge of breaking through from some large cloud based organizations to the mass of top 2000 companies worldwide. A perfect time to learn more about it.

Are you curious, in for a game and a new DevOps retrospective tool, come to our session!

Goal of the session: Know what DevOps stands for, be able to join in discussions about DevOps and gain experience in how to bring Development and Operations Guys and Girls together.
Intended audience: Marieke, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke and Ellen
Expected experience: Basic knowledge of Development and Operations practices
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation, movies and downloads: see the ScrumUP blog

According to Gartner DevOps is on the virge of breaking through from some large cloud based organizations to the mass of top 2000 companies worldwide. A perfect time to learn more about it.

DevOps integrates Development and Operations. Its aim is to get application changes and additions to production much faster. This enables the business to drastically reduce time-to-market and start realising benefits faster. It also enables the business to boosting innovation by experimenting in production with minimal risks.

Are you curious, in for a game and a new DevOps retrospective tool, come to our session!

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
20

Portable computer

Refactoring legacy code driven by tests

Learn how to improve legacy code and make it unit-testable

Luca Minudel & Saleem Siddiqui

The legacy code-base is hard to test? The unit-tests suite accesses the db and other external systems? This hands-on coding session includes exercises in C#, Java, Ruby, JavaScript and Python to learn how to break dependencies and apply dependency injection driven by tests.

Goal of the session: Have fun coding and learn-while-doing. Experience the most common refactorings used for testing and refactoring legacy code. See in practice the relation between unit testing and code that is easier to change, extend, evolve. See examples of how good OO Programming follows design principles without getting lost in broad, generic and abstract definitions.
Intended audience: Marieke, Bram, Hank, Jan. Who want to learn how to refactor a legacy code-base and how to write unit-tests that don't make calls to the db and external systems. Who have interest in unit testing and refactoring of legacy code.
Expected experience: Fluency in one of the 5 languages supported for the coding dojo.Previous basic-intermediate experience in Unit Testing.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: The github repo with code for the exercises.

Are you working on a legacy code-base that's hard to test? And you cannot refactor it because there are no tests? The unit-tests suite makes calls to the database and other external systems?

During this Coding Dojo you'll be assigned 2 coding challenges in Java, C#, Ruby, JavaScript or Python. You will face the challenge of refactoring existing code in order to make it testable and to write unit tests.

After each coding challenge we'll discuss your solutions and we'll highlight and explain the refactoring required to make the code testable.

This coding dojo is based on the exercises from the paper 'TDD with Mock Objects: Design Principles and Emergent Properties'. The exercises are also included in 'The Coding Dojo Handbook' by Emily Bache with foreword by Robert C. Martin.

Reading list:

  • Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests; Steve Freeman, Nat Pryce
  • Test Driven Development: By Example; Kent Beck
  • Working Effectively with Legacy; Michael Feathers
  • Agile Software Development, Principles, Patterns, and Practices; Robert C. Martin (C++, Java)
  • Agile Principles, Patterns, and Practices in C#; Robert C. Martin (C#)

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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20

Portable computer

Brutal Refactoring Game

Did you know you can have legacy code after only 15 minutes? This is why we will be brutal with the coding smells. We will take the time to refactor soon and often.

Adi Bolboaca & Erik Talboom

The facilitator will be your benevolent dictator. His wish is to have the cleanest code possible. This is why any code smell must be removed immediately when spotted. This is why, while coding, the facilitator will stop you whenever he spots a coding smell. Adding functionalities is forbidden until you refactor the smell away.

Goal of the session: Find out how to do real refactoring.Learn why refactoring is good and how to use it.Find out how you can discipline yourself while refactoring all the code smells out of your system.
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Good knowledge of at least one programming language.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session
Materials: Presentation

During this session a list of coding smells will be used by the facilitator. All the smells will be explained by the facilitator in the introduction. The facilitator will stop you whenever he will spot a coding smell. You are not allowed to continue adding new functionalities, until the facilitator accepts the change.

There will be four pomodorros (sessions of 25 minutes) during which you will do pair-programming.
After each session we will stop for about five minutes and talk about the progress we are making and the inconveniences we are facing.
At the end we will have a conclusion of about 15 minutes when we will share the experiences we had during the session.

You will need a laptop with a working and testing environment installed for your preferred language. This session will be language agnostic. Also you should have locally installed a source control software (git, bzr, mercurial etc) to be able to commit often on your machine, without being dependent on internet.
You need to have a development environment for a language of your choice.

If you are a non-technical person you are invited to join in, just to watch how the session takes place. I would be happy to explain to you the challenges of working with legacy code, and some of the solutions like cleaning the code and removing technical debt as soon as possible.

If you want to read more about this session please read my blog post.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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25

Scaling the Product Owner role

What’s the next most important thing?

Timo Punkka

Come to this workshop to learn how to scale the Product Owner role in order to harness the true potential of self-organizing Agile teams. You will learn by doing, but you will be also hear a real-life story.

During this workshop you will will create a framework for scaling the Product Owner role. Continuous customer collaboration at different levels, with different focus, will also be covered. Your work will be guided with a real-life story linking the exercise to reality.

Goal of the session: Participants will learn why development team agility is not enough. They will also learn ways to scale the Product Owner role in complex situations, such as multiple product lines, different types of engineering, complex and/or distributed customer chain.
Intended audience: Ellen, Joke, Hank
Expected experience: Basic understanding of Agile Development on team level and understanding of organizations in general.
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Abstract

Come to this workshop to learn how to scale the Product Owner role in order to harness the true potential of self-organizing Agile teams. You will learn by doing, but you will be also hear a real-life story.

Using Agile development methods development teams improve their capability to deliver through transparency and predictability. However, this does not bring the outcome companies are seeking if the developed features are not the right ones. The product owner role in Scrum simplifies the interface between business and development. This obviously brings immediate relief in many cases, but in practice, the responsibility of the Product Owner is far too wide for a single person in all except the most simplistic scenarios. Naturally the pragmatic Product Owner works with number of domain experts and other stakeholders. Things in real-life get even more complicated, as organizations have multiple product lines, yet the development should be aligned with the company’s strategy. To add to the challenge, for example embedded system development including own hardware platform development brings additional concerns, such as less flexibility than software development and dependency on external suppliers. To date, the practical information on how to do this remains limited.

During this workshop you will will create a framework for scaling the Product Owner role. Continuous customer collaboration at different levels, with different focus, will also be covered. Your work will be guided with a real-life story linking the exercise to reality.

Learning topics

  • Lean portfolio management
  • Different planning horizons in an Agile organization
  • Importance of shared understanding of direction in an Agile organization

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

The lonely analyst in an agile team

Analyze and solve your most pressing agile analysis issues

Thien Que Nguyen & Merlijn van Minderhout

Share and really understand the issues analysts, product owners and product managers face in agile teams. Search and share solutions to some of those issues. Maybe you'll go back to work on Monday with concrete actions to solve your most pressing issues.

Goal of the session: Share some of the most common impediments and issues analysts, product managers and product owners encounter in agile teams. Find some solutions. Maybe go away with concrete actions to solved your impediment on Monday.
Intended audience: Marieke, Georges, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Some experience as analyst, product owner or product manager in an agile team. Or you have worked with one or more people in one of these roles in an agile team.
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Workshop outputs

Working as an analyst, product manager or product owner in an agile team is not always easy:

  • The whole way of working is different than what I'm used to!
  • The team has a voracious appetite for stories and information. I can't keep up!
  • The team wants everything cut into teensy tiny bits. How do I make requirement carpaccio? How do I keep the overall view?
  • <Your problem here>

Join us in this workshop to share your most pressing agile analysis and product management issues and apply business analysis technique to really understand those issues.

Maybe you'll discover some ideas to solve some of these issues. Maybe you'll be impatient for Monday to come so that you can implement the concrete actions to tackle your most pressing issue.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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40

The Neuroscience of Agile Leadership

Influencing mindset shifts in your organization

Jenni Jepsen

We know from experience that Agile works to increase people's motivation, joy of work, and effectiveness. But why, from a brain perspective, do things like having the overview, influence, autonomy and certainty work to make us feel more rewarded at work? How do we help ourselves and our people adapt better to change? And how can we shift our mindsets to become more Agile?

Learn the brain science that supports why all the "soft, people stuff" around Agile works, discover how to help people adapt better to change and how to influence mindset shifts in your organization.

Goal of the session: Understand the "hard science" behind the "soft people stuff" of Agile and how to use knowledge about how the brain works to better motivate people around change.
Intended audience: Anyone interested in helping people adjust to change and learn more about the science behind human motivation.
Expected experience: Suitable for all experience levels
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

We know from experience that Agile works to increase people's motivation, joy of work, and effectiveness. But why, from a brain perspective, do things like having the overview, influence, autonomy and certainty work to make us feel more rewarded at work? How do we help ourselves and our people adapt better to change? And how can we shift our mindsets to become more Agile?

Within the last 10 years, scientists have gained a new, far more accurate view of human nature and behavior change due to the breakthrough research in neuroscience. The implications are particularly relevant for leaders. And it explains why the principles of Agile leadership appeal to people, in general.

Through theory, real-life examples and exercises, learn the brain science that supports why all the "soft, people stuff" around Agile works, discover how to help people adapt better to change using the brain-based SCARF model* and how to influence mindset shifts in your organization.

*The SCARF model, developed by David Rock, is about: Status, Certainty, Autonomy, Relatedness & Fairness. There are two themes emerging from social neuroscience. Firstly, that much of our motivation driving social behavior is governed by an overarching organizing principle of minimizing threat and maximizing reward (Gordon, 2000). Secondly, that several domains of social experience draw upon the same brain networks to maximize reward and minimize threat as the brain networks used for primary survival needs (Lieberman and Eisenberger, 2008). in other words, social needs are treated in much the same way in the brain as the need for food and water. The SCARF model summarizes these two themes within a framework that captures the common factors that can activate a reward or threat response in the brain.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

Get out of SCRUM, get into KANBAN

Experience how to change from the SCRUM board to the KANBAN board

Sandra Warmolts

Want to go from SCRUM to KANBAN, or a combination of SCRUM and KANBAN?
This session will give you hands-on tips and tricks to change ToDo/Doing/Done into multiple KANBAN columns.

You will:
1. Experience the SCRUM-sprint by implementing some user stories
2. Create the KANBAN board
3. Experience the KANBAN-period with the same user stories

What are the pros and cons? ... let's discuss!!!

Goal of the session: Have a hands-on experience how to create a KANBAN board
Intended audience: Leo, Marieke, Bram, Ellen, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Hank
Expected experience: Basic knowledge of SCRUM and KANBAN
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Presentation

Your team is doing SCRUM for some time now, but you want to see and create more flow. This might be a good point to move to KANBAN, or at least to combine the two. But how do we move from "to do", "doing" and "done" to all those nice KANBAN columns.

In this session we will start with a SCRUM-board with users stories split into many tasks. Later in the session you will step-by-step transform this board with a group into a KANBAN board.
In both situations we will simulate a sprint or a 2 week period and see and feel what the differences are in flow and visualization on the SCRUM board and on the KANBAN board.

You will experience SCRUM as well as KANBAN with the same user stories and the same team.
The last part of the session is to discuss what eye-openers there were for you and what disappointments.

This session is not about KANBAN or SCRUM being better than the other. I am in favor of combining and mixing framework, so a combination of SCRUM and KANBAN works great for me.

During the session I will tell you a little about two teams who transferred from a SCRUM board to a KANBAN board, why we did it, what they like and what were the pitfalls.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Getting target-processor-specific legacy code under testing in PC

Methods used for creating test environment for embedded C code base described and analyzed

Jani Söderström & Ron Ahonen

Come to learn from the work of the presenters' team on two embedded legacy C code projects how to move from single-target, single-compiler, manual-testing-needed, single-engineer environment to multi-target, multi-compiler, multi-testing, agile team environment in two years.

You will hear about methods, disciplines and coding techniques used in the move.

Goal of the session: tips for work and encouragement to test embedded devices properly
Intended audience: Marieke, Jan, Philippe and Georges
Expected experience: knowledge of C
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Embedded devices have been developed for decades but the culture of their development has not changed as rapidly as of applications running in computers. Usually the environment for developing embedded devices has been based on the work of the processor manufacturer and it contains a compiler and a debugger for a specific target board which has worked for one-man projects. But nowadays embedded projects are also growing beneath the capability of one man to tackle and a team is needed. This presentation shows two practical examples from the same team.

Come to learn from the work of the presenters' team on two embedded legacy C code projects how to move from single-target, single-compiler, manual-testing-needed, single-engineer environment to multi-target, multi-compiler, multi-testing, agile team environment in two years.

You will hear about methods, disciplines and coding techniques used in the move.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

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max
30

Ignore the cost accountants at your peril, because they won’t ignore you

Explore accounting's influence on your project or product

Pierre Hervouet & Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Your company's CFO and accountants can be the worst enemies of your agile/lean project or your best allies.

Dora the Explorer, every kid's best friend, will guide you through the marvelous management accounting world. Through interactive exercises you'll explore the impacts of the dominant Cost Accounting mindset and discover three alternative or complementary approaches:

  • Throughput Accounting
  • Lean Accounting
  • Beyond Budgeting

Once you've walked a mile in their shoes, you'll be ready for a good conversation with your CFO and accountants to solve your common problems together.

Goal of the session: Understand the effects of "classic" cost accounting on agile and lean work. Discover some alternatives. Prepare for a conversation with your CFO and accountants.
Intended audience: Those involved in planning or managing (improvement) projects and products (George, Vincent, Joke, Ellen, Leo, Hank, Joke). Philippe can come for the cocktails.
Expected experience: Some experience with budgets, planning, estimating is useful but not necessary
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Background information

Don't you hate to estimate, track and justify costs? Why do we need to do that? Because we need product costs

  • To calculate prices
  • To know if a project or product is (still) profitable
  • To decide where to invest our money
  • To verify if the investment brought any benefits
  • To justify the content of a proposal

But “classic” financial cost accounting and budgeting has some assumptions and practices that run counter to agile and lean improvement

  • We assume that we can break down a system like a company (and its customers and suppliers) into independent elements and that the whole is equal to the sum of its elements
  • We assume that we can assign each cost to individual products or activities, whichever is the focus of our system decomposition. The difficulty lies in costs that are shared across products or activities.
  • We assume that more precision, more detail will give more correct results. Precise, detailed cost tracking can have a large cost. And then we need to track the cost of tracking costs...
  • We assume that the price (and value) of a product is a function of its cost (+ some markup)
  • We assume that we can predict what we’ll do and what resources we’ll need a long time in the future, so that we can fix the company’s budget at most once a year. Once the budget is set in stone everybody’s rewarded when they stick to the budget, thereby proving that the budget (procedure) was correct. And then the gaming of the system starts...

This session introduces and lets you explore three alternative/complementary approaches:

  • Throughput Accounting
  • Lean Accounting
  • Beyond Budgeting

Maybe these will give you ideas to go talk with your CFO and cost accountants because they're facing the same issues that you are. Maybe together you can find a way to make your organisation a bit more agile...

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program

Walt Disney creativity technique

How to develop high quality idea's and get the plan to execute

Jan De Baere

As Agilists we value iterations so why not use them to develop and refine idea's and plans? If you want a high level solution for your business, technical or other issue you can use the proven method used and developed by Walt Disney himself. The technique gets you to create idea's, make the plans to realize them and is designed to deliver the highest quality possible. It's iterative, frustrating (sorry) and fun. Perfect match for Agile projects.

Goal of the session: Apply the technique/strategy Walt Disney used to create maybe the most creative company in the world
Intended audience: people interest in the creativity process of Walt Disney
Expected experience: none
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Walt Disney was a high school dropout who suffered several business disasters and bankruptcy. He overcame his personal and financial challenges by using his imagination to create an entertainment empire that has touched the hearts, minds and emotions of all of us.

He summarized his creativity in one word: Imagineering. The term “Imagineering” combines the words imagination and engineering. Imagineering enabled him to transform the dreams, fantasies and wishes from his imagination into concrete reality.

Disney’s thinking strategy involved exploring something using three different perceptual positions. An insight into these positions comes from the comment made by one of his animators that:

“…there were actually three different Walts: the dreamer, the realist, and the spoiler (critic). You never knew which one was coming into your meeting.”

The technique could be used when you want to develop a new idea or elaborate upon an exciting one. This is done by freely dreaming in the first phase. In a second phase you become practical and work out the idea. In a third phase we become the critics, not the ideas are criticized but the practical implementation. Despite what you would think this is where most people have trouble as we are thought not to be negative. After that we can start dreaming again! The art is to split up the "mindsets".

A workshop where we learn and apply the technique used by Walt Disney to create what maybe is the most creative company in the world.


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30

Succeeding with Agile; how to change a company’s DNA

Joost Mulders & Astrid Claessen

To get the full benefits of agile companies need to take the agile adoption further then just the local isolated processes in an organization such as a development or operations department. We need to transform companies in adaptable organizations.

Company wide agile transformations however also bring a new audience for the agile coach, CEO's middle managers, non IT related departments, etc. Different people with different mindsets, opinions and experience will react differently when experiencing an agile transformation.

This session will focus on understanding the different ways to react on changes that we will discover during these agile transformations and together we will discover ways to act on this and to adapt our coaching style to it.

Goal of the session: Takeaways:The most important learning goals of this session will be:- Insights in the impact that large scale agile transformations have.- Understanding of how the human brain responds to changes that are introduced. And how to work with this knowledge to adapt - A set of “tools” (coaching techniques) to guide an organization through a complete agile transformation.
Intended audience: Persona's: Georges Vincent Joke EllenAnd basically everybody that's interested in coaching and how people respond to it.
Expected experience: n/a
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Session materials

Agile implementations focus primarily on improving the efficiency of local and often isolated processes within an organization such as a development or operations department. The result of this is a suboptimal improvement where only a small benefit can be achieved.

To succeed with agile organizations need to change in a broader context. A true agile transformation changes a company to become an adaptive organization that is ready to respond to the constantly changing world around it.

Company wide agile transformations however also bring a new audience for the agile coach, CEO's middle managers, non IT related departments, etc. Different people with different mindsets, opinions and experience will react differently when experiencing an agile transformation.

This session will focus on understanding the different ways to react on changes that we will discover during these agile transformations and together we will discover ways to act on this and to adapt our coaching style to it.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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30

Fail early, fail often

Establishing a culture of experimentation - you aren't learning if you aren't failing

Marc Evers & Hans Kalle

Agile has made us realize development is a complex process where you can't know everything up front; you need to use feedback, work iteratively, apply, inspect & adapt. Recent developments like the Cynefin Framework and Real Options take this a step further. In this session you will learn why & how to run multiple safe to fail experiments in parallel, and move towards a culture of experimentation and learning.

Goal of the session: Learn how to establish a learning culture in your organisation by running safe to fail experiments
Intended audience: managers, team leads, product managers, product owners, architects, scrum masters (Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen)
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session
Materials: Slides and handout

One of the things agile brought us is the insight that software development (and product development for that matter) is mostly a complex problem. We continuously have to make decisions - on products, features, priorities, architecture, design, technical debt - that lie in the complex domain. We cannot find a good let alone the best solution in advance, regardless of how much analysis and expertise we throw in. Only after the fact we know the quality of our decisions (and even that knowledge won't help us much for future decisions).

Agile development and frameworks like Scrum try to tackle this by working in short iterations and applying feedback at many levels - apply, inspect & adapt.

Working iteratively towards a moving goal is a first step. Recent developments like Cynefin and Real Options offer new insights and approaches for navigating through complex problems like product development: run multiple safe-to-fail experiments or probes in parallel. Running small experiments (some of which will fail) will help you rapidly learn and see what direction to take. Running many parallel experiments might seem costly, however, taking many small bets will pay off much better than putting all your eggs in one basket by taking decisions without a clue (you might be lucky but gambling is no way to run a business).

An example of a small experiment is to do a time boxed spike in which one tries to implement one of the proposed software designs. Or a team could implement two design candidates in parallel for some time in order to know which one works best.

In this session we will focus on safe to fail experiments: how do you define and manage them? This session is hands on - in small groups, you will work on defining & proposing possible experiments for a project or product you bring in. Your proposal will be scrutinized by other groups so that you'll return to work with some experiments ready to run.

We'll mix elements of the Cynefin sensemaking framework, Don Reinertsen's Principles of Product Development Flow and Dan Mezick's The Culture Game.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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The Server That Goes Ping!

Test-Drive your programming in Node.js

Emmanuel Gaillot & François de Metz

In this session, we'll do some live coding and demonstrate a possible way to code from A to Z (with tests) an HTTP server in Node.js that requests informations from a third-party Minecraft server.

Goal of the session: Participants will learn : to test-drive the coding of an HTTP server in Node.js, to test-drive the coding of an HTTP client in Node.js, * to find excuses to play Minecraft at work for "educational purposes"
Intended audience: Jan, Leo, Bram, Vincent, Hank
Expected experience: Attendees are expected to have prior notions in programming, especially in Node.js, as well as some understanding of traditional (i.e., synchronous) TDD practice
Session Type: 75 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Node.js is getting increasingly popular among developers who have to code HTTP servers. And because its underlying single-threaded model makes programming with Node.js quite an unusual experience, developers have one more excuse not to test-drive their code. In this session, we'll do some live coding and demonstrate a possible way to code from A to Z (with tests) an HTTP server that requests informations from a third-party Minecraft server – in the hope to inspire the audience to follow the same path, or to find an even better one.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

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The Art of Being Wrong

Laurent Bossavit

Learn to transform your everyday mistakes into a useful game of continuous improvement.

Goal of the session: Learn a new super-power: that of making predictions that can actually yield actionable feedback.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Philippe, Vincent, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: No prerequisites
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Hate being wrong? You are not alone - it's a dreadful feeling.

One would have to be a little crazy to keep a daily record of the thoughts you firmly believed in yesterday and that turned out wrong today. Wouldn't one? Yet, if you rarely or never consciously make mistakes, how do you think you can possibly improve?

This impertinent and playful workshop is an invitation to transform your everyday mistakes into a useful game of continuous improvement. There will be exercises, just enough theory to get by, and maybe some soul-searching.

Come and learn a new super-power: that of making predictions that can actually yield actionable feedback and help you improve as a forecaster in all areas of life.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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The power of habit

how creating good habit can save your project

Yves Hanoulle

For me, agile is about a mindset and a continuous improvement of everything.
To create a mindset of improving and working on ourselves, we need to have a team that gets into the habit of improving.

Goal of the session: Participants will learn how they can create or change habits in their life.
Intended audience: Jan,Marieke,Leo,Bram,Philippe,Georges,Vincent,Joke,Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: I'm good myself at creating new habits for myself
Session Type: 75 min discovery session
Materials: Slides

For me, agile is about a mindset and a continuous improvement of everything.
To create a mindset of improving and working on ourselves, we need to have a team that gets into the habit of improving.

This will be a presentation (with some small exercises)

- What is the habit loop
- The Craving Brain
- Golden rule of habit change
- the habits of successful organisations
- are we responsible for our habits?

The presentation is loosely based on the book: The power of habit. (Told by using pictures of my family, with our stories)

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan
Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke
Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo
Bram has never missed an XP Day. Bram likes he XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram
Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe
Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges
Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent
Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke
Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank
Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Joost Mulders

Website: www.kuzidi.com

Twitter: @joostmulders

Joost Mulders; Agilist and management innovator.

Passionate to help people, teams and organizations to re-invent the workplace discovering practices that guide them to a level of continuous improvement and becoming truly agile.

Implementing agile practices since 2006 and having a strong background in a large diversity of roles within software development as a developer, business analyst, project manager, agile coach, trainer and manager enables me to understand the challenges of agile transformations on all levels in the organization.

This experience combined with my enthusiasm to find a spark in every person helps me to facilitate people to excel and achieve greatness at work.

A full overview of my professional experience can be found at: www.joostmulders.nl


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Andriy Korpan

Website: http://www.symphony-solutions.eu

I’m working as a Scrum Master for the nears shore outsourcing company. We have been building ITSM product with our Dutch partners for more than three years.
Having team members in different locations makes life difficult, however, way more interesting.
My goal is my team to become completely self-organized, innovative, self-learning.
Meanwhile, I see a personal growth and good relationship as a part of overall success, I am eager to help each team member to develop himself as an excellent QA, developer or personality.
I hope they will inspire other people in and out of the company.
I believe Agile and Friendship are good tools to build that.


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Dajo Breddels

Website: http://www.kuzidi.com/whykuzidi/team/dajo-breddels/

Twitter: @dajobreddels

Dajo Breddels, Agile Coach with a big interest in developing new playful and creative ways to give insights and help in cultural transformation.


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Laurens Bonnema

By day, Laurens works as an Agile coach and trainer with Xebia to help organizations transform to Agile. By night, he is Treasurer of Agile Holland, co-organizer of Agile Coach Camp Netherlands, and member of the Agile Consortium's Agile Certification workgroup.

Laurens strives to merge classic and Agile management in the conviction that it is the future of professional management. He is an experienced, and sometimes even celebrated, public speaker. His XP Days presentation on the Political Economy of Agile Projects even started with applause!

Laurens lives in Dordrecht, The Netherlands, with his wife Nienke Blauw and son Mark.


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Serge Beaumont

He's like... super cool!


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Michel Grootjans

Michel Grootjans has been programming since the age of 12. He has programmed strange machines like the TI 99-4A, the Atari 2600, Mac128, HP28, Apple II, Siemens PLC's using languages like Basic, Pascal, C, HyperTalk, Assembler, … along the way.

His professional experiences includes building enterprise applications for government, chemical plants, telecom, HR, insurance companies, … in java, C# and ruby.

He's an independent technical agile coach. He coaches agile teams on continuous improvement, trying to find the most productive principles and practices to deliver value for the customer as fast as possible, while aiming for a product that is both flexible and maintainable.

Presentation Bio:
He's been giving regular talks at conferences like XpDays BeNeLux, ACCU, Agile .net Europe, Arrrrcamp. Topics have included:
- Rails for n00bs
- the importance of readability in code
- several coding dojos in C#, Ruby and javascript
- getting started with NHibernate
- pragmatic project setup ⇒ how to privately setup source control and CI in 15 minutes
- agile acceptance testing with FitNesse
- timesaving tools for .net developers
- refactoring to patterns with ReSharper
- continuous integration in .net (in 2004, long before TFS)
- lightning talk on ook

Gives a three-day training about principles, patterns and practices, including the GoF patterns and the SOLID guidelines


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Linda Dorlandt

Momentarily I am involved in managing business change initiatives within FloraHolland (the Dutch Flower Auction). In this work I facilitate connections between team members and encourage them to take responsibility and in doing that I help self organization teams to emerge. Since four years I am also a member of the Works Council which provides me with a lot of knowledge of the organization and its surroundings. The Works Council of FloraHolland is transforming itself to be more innovative and as second chairman of the council one of my responsibilities is putting together the training program to get there. I am now finishing my Bachelor in Business Psychology which explains my interest in new insights in improving peoples ways of working and in Agile and Scrum as tools to reach that goal.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/lindadorlandt


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Mirna den Blanken

With 8 years experience in ICT as a projectmanager and 5 years experience as teamleader of a Marketing intelligence team, I like to combine the best of both worlds. Using elements from scrum and agile, my team is 1) better informed of each others activities, 2) more focust on results and 3) working together more efficient and amplifying each other.

Study:
- School for Digital Communication, Utrecht
- Labour and Organizational Psychology, Open University, Amsterdam


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Joost Jonker

Joost Jonker

Twitter: @jstjnkr

Scrum Master at Tricode

While I'm still fairly new to Agile (less than 3 years), I’ve already fullfilled the roles of Scrum Master, Product Owner, Business Analyst and Tester at one time or another in the past 3 years. I started my career as a developer implementing prototypes of new products & services. Later I switched to the marketing side of new product development.

I'm always looking for ways to challenge my team, to create a good atmosphere suited for learning and collaboration as well as to encourage people to step forward and to help improving the team, its processes and its product. I want to keep feeding my team with new ideas; also urging them to look at how others tackled their problems. Finally, I hope I can facilitate my organization and its customers to become more suitable places for Agile professionals to work - infusing them with ideas based on agility, 21st century leadership, lean, organizational transformation and so on.


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Marcel Blok

Marcel started out as a Biology student, with internships in evolutionary botany and bioinformatics. Little did he know that the combination of evolutionary thinking combined with information technology was setting him already up for lean and agile thinking.

Then, 13 years ago, he entered the IT industry, in which he encountered heavy waterfall process, that were actually executed quite well, but ate lots of time and resources, and left over little flexibility for incorporating new thoughts, or wishes from the customers. Trying to overcome the pitfalls he learned all the skills involved: development, technical and functional design, architecture and business analysis skills. Even team management skills. Although this helped a bit (and was fun to learn), it never solved the issue, as it was in the process.

Then after a few years he discovered agile techniques and started to implement these. He was fortunate enough to end up working for a company that embraced scrum methodologies, and there he got to learn and experience agile, lean and XP practices.

He doesn't favor one practice over an other, and picks the best practice that suits the job at hand. A wide range of practices and skills helps to collaborate with all people involved. As quite an all-rounder, he is now most involved in architecture and business analysis, always working from within a team. Recently he is also focusing on interaction design, as it is becoming a more and more important area, which has not yet fully adopted agile practices.


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Alexandre Boutin


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Hoang-Anh PHAN

Twitter: @hoanganhphan

Born in Vietnam, I grew up in France, worked in London and now in Vietnam. I am one of those who sometimes wonder "where is home". I moved back to Vietnam to find about my origins and see how I could contribute to Vietnam's development and enrich my own experience by sharing knowledge and things I value and believe in. Among those, agility is one that I see essential for the future of the country. I am currently leading the IT outsourcing and offshoring activity at Officience to promote agility and offsharing.


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Anais Victor

Product Owner and Engagement Leader at Officience - Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam

After already 1 year and half, I moved to Vietnam, to work abroad as a Business Analyst. It's where I discovered Agile, and step by step became an Agile Lover... Then As common as it is for a BA I became a Product Owner naturally. And I realized that Agile changed my life. I really have pleasure to work, I enjoy the relationships with the teams and customers, and it seems that agile simplify many things, and I really like these work conditions

The revelation was the Agile Vietnam Tour where I met many wonderful agile speakers and people involved in Agile in Vietnam, with a true passion in agile, and very open-minded. I'm now involved in Agile Vietnam Community, and I like to learn about Agile in Europe and to share experiences about agile from Vietnam.

Agile is very useful for vietnamese people who doesn't dare to take the leadership due to their culture and past history. So I'm very proud to see the effects of Agile in our teams after 1year, thinking that we can still change the things!


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Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten is an experienced Agile/Scrum coach, practicing Scrum since 2006.
Paul is a recovering Prince II practitioner, who once was a pretty bad programmer.

Paul has trained hundreds of people on Agile/Scrum and related topics and regularly presents to various audiences. Paul is a Scrum.org certified Scrum trainer.

Having introduced Scrum in multiple organizations, Paul knows about the pitfalls along the way and the hard work required. More importantly, Paul knows the rewards when you persevere.
He helps organizations move towards more business agility, and effective product development.


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Attila Nyeste

Scrum Master @ SpilGames BV

Coming from Hungary, but have been working in the Netherlands for more than 3 years at Spil Games as Scrum Master.
I'm very passionate about agile, process improvements, and people around software development.
I'm a desperate troubleshooter :-)


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Damien THOUVENIN

Former baby coder (since 1980) I studied software engineering, graduated in 1996, and started my career at an ERP editor where I eventually became lead architect. I then worked for a agri-businesses production solutions editor and finally created my own company in 2004.
With thirty-ish consultants, CLT is both a consulting firm - specialized in improving businesses efficiency through agile and tailored software (built on the .NET platform) - and a laboratory for innovation in management.
Today, my time is split between running my company, speaking at conferences, consulting for clients and advocating for enterprise gender and ethnic diversity.


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Pierrick Revol

After 8 years of software development for the industry (Transportation, Aeronautic, Military) Pierrick Revol turned to Agile Methods and experienced it on critical projects during 3 years. He has recently joined Valtech coach team and he is now supporting major industries in their adoption of Scrum.


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Ole Jepsen

Ole is the founder of goAgile and a highly esteemed Agile facilitator and mentor for organizations looking to lead change. Using his expertise in Agile methodologies, Ole shows how gaining varying perspectives and sharing experiences brings about the best ideas that can be used throughout the organization.

Ole is a founder of the Agile Leadership Network (ALN), having started the “Learning and Recognition” Committee—working on defining and implementing a three-level certification program for great Agile Project Leaders. Ole is the founder and leader of the Danish Agile User Group – and he is active in the international agile community, speaking at conferences and consulting worldwide. Ole is also a Certified StrategicPlay® Facilitator with LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY™.


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Rob Westgeest

I have been working in IT for about 18 years.

I have created software and taught and coached projects and individuals in analysis, design, programming and development methods.

I am a software engineer with a passion for both technology and people.

With WillemvandenEnde and MarcEvers I joined forces in QWAN (www.qwan.it).
We provide highly interactive training course on software development skills and agile software development in the Netherlands and abroad.


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Lars Vonk

Agilist with a passion for crafting software
My pasion is programming in a dedicated team and building great software. I also like to help teams to raise their level of knowledge and professionalism by hands-on coaching. Advocate of XP practices like TDD, Continuous Integration and all that other good stuff. Besides programming I frequently act as co-trainer during Scrum/Agile trainings and workshops.

Current areas of expertise and interest: Ruby, Scala, Java, Sinatra, Scalatra, 0 downtime deployments, eventsourcing to name a few


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Frans Overbeek

Frans is writing code for 15 years. In these 15 years the languages, methods, projects and customers changed but the passion in coding stayed the same. And he likes to share and discuss his view on writing awesome code.


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Astrid Claessen

Astrid Claessen

Website: http://www.kuzidi.com

Twitter: @astridclaessen

Jacqueline of all trades & energizer bunny.

I have always looked around me and saw things that could be improved upon. That is why continuous improvement resonates with me so strongly. With experience in almost every role available in software development I'm able to understand the challenges teams face when transforming to Agile. Using that understanding I can help them overcome obstacles on their way.

Experience working abroad in: India, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Hong Kong and China. This helps me understand more of the cultural aspect, which is a big part of any Agile transformation.

Chairman of Agile Holland.

This is the agile version of my resume: http://astridclaessen.com


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Olivier Costa

Website: www.aegisoft.be

Olivier Costa

is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns Aikido from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a Japanese grand-master and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.
www.WareNatuur.be

He has always been involved in the whole software development cycle. From (business) idea over development & testing until release, follow up (business satisfaction) and maintenance. While writing code primarily in C#, he became an Agile Coach (for very diverse teams writing in very diverse languages) in search of a team he wants to work in.

My top 2 favorite books are:


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Thien Que Nguyen

Did you ever encounter teams having difficulty working together?
Or did you ever experience a company where no one knows the whole process, only bits and pieces?
Or is your team working day and night and still nothing gets done?

I help teams to create serious improvement by using LEAN values/thinking, playing system thinking games, by making bottlenecks visible, but mostly by letting people experience the issues.

One team reduced their lead time from 5 weeks to 5 working days. Another team regained their creativity and fun. And this gave them back their control to change their work in small visible steps.


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Ron Eringa

In his daily job Ron Eringa is an Agile coach, working at Prowareness.
Since he started his career in 2000 he has encountered lots of softare projects, struggling with traditional development methodologies, having forgotten how beautifull it is and how creative it can be to develop software.
However in 2004 he also encountered projects working with Scrum & Agile and he saw that teams rediscovered that original spark that made them become good software developers.

In the last few years Ron has been providing Agile workshops and coaching Agile teams while also participating as a Scrum master and Developer himself. Ron is an enthousiastic speaker, who enjoys to share knowledge and work with empowered teams.

In his private life, Ron is a husband and father of 2 daughters. His hobbies are running, skiing, photography and reading.


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Edwin de Werk

Edwin de Werk

Website: www.scrum.nl

Twitter: @eworx4me

Edwin de Werk is een Agile Coach bij Prowareness. Dagelijkse bezigheden zijn Agile Transisties bij bedrijven begeleiden en het coachen van Management, Scrummasters, Productowners en teamleden bij het stap voor stap verbeteren van de Agile mindset.
Mijn motto is "Meer met Minder"


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Remi-Armand Collaris

Remi-Armand Collaris

Website: www.scrumup.com

Twitter: @racollaris

Remi-Armand Collaris is an Agile Facilitator and Management Consultant at Ordina and trainer at Lagant, both based in the Netherlands. He has helped a number of financial, insurance and (semi) government organizations implement Agile to improve IT effectiveness using methods like Scrum, XP and RUP. He publishes in blogs and magazines and wrote two books on combining Agile methods (see www.scrumup.com and www.rupopmaat.nl and www.agileopmaat.nl). Furthermore he is a gifted speaker who knows how to inspire people. The quote from Loesje “Why make it difficult when you can make it together” fits him perfectly.


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Jan-Sake Kruis

Jan-Sake Kruis is an Agile coach, trainer and management consultant at Ordina based in the Netherlands. Jan-Sake has more than 15 years of experience in software development, project management, people and team leadership and Agile coaching. At the moment Jan-Sake works as an Agile coach and participates in Agile, Scrum and DevOps transformations of different value chains at ING. He is always learning by reading books, blogs and other available stuff all kind of Agile and Lean topics, but for him the most important part is like Nike’s slogan: “just do it”.


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Luca Minudel

Luca Minudel

Website: http://blogs.ugidotnet.org/luKa/

Twitter: @lukadotnet

An atypical Italian: can not sing, can not cook and does not ring mum every day :)
Has worked 4 years in Stockholm and is currently working in London for ThoughtWorks as Trainer & Coach.

Experienced in Scrum, XP, Lean-Agile, Social Complexity. Has worked with large and legacy code-bases, complex products and domains, enterprise level applications and large organizations.

Working in professional software delivery since 1989, with Agile practices since 2002.
During 2006-2009 has contributed to advance the adoption of Agile practices in Ferrari F1 Racing Team. In an inherently Agile business/domain in a unique context characterized by high levels of pressure, uncertainty, interdependency, rapid unpredictable changes and with technologies and competitors that are fast moving targets.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/lucaminudel


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Saleem Siddiqui

Saleem Siddiqui is a software developer and agile coach with ThoughtWorks. For the last 15+ years, he's worked on delivering software for several customers, large and small. He has traveled a fair bit over the world in pursuit of his other passion: explaining about aspects of software delivery to others. As much as he loves to create and talk about software, his most serene moments are in the company of his wife and daughter, with whom he spends his non-traveling time in Hamburg.


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Adi Bolboaca

Who am I
I wanted to develop software to help my clients improve their business.
I was helped by my professors, colleagues and mentors to continuously improve both my technical and analysis skills.
Whenever I write code I focus on reducing domain complexity to obtain maintainable software.

Some background
Worked with companies from Netherlands, Romania, Italy, France.
Was involved in developing software for domains like: energy, ecommerce, banking, customs and ERP/CRM software.
Knowledgeable in software technical domains like: clean code, test driven development, simple design, emergent design.
Facilitated many code retreats in: Romania, Belgium, France, Germany, Netherlands.
Likes to teach.
Continuous learner and challenger of existing ideas and concepts.
Keen interest in serious games, and using gamestorming for continuous improvement.
Fluent in Romanian, English and French. I am learning German.
Active in the communities from Europe: Romania, Belgium, France, Germany, Agile Lean Europe Network.
Worked on desktop and web applications.

Read more about my ideas at http://blog.adrianbolboaca.ro and find me on twitter at http://twitter.com/adibolb

Current position
I work at Mozaic Works, in Bucharest, Romania as a technical and organisational trainer and coach. More info: http://www.mozaicworks.com


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Erik Talboom

Erik Talboom

Website: co-learning.be

Twitter: @talboomerik


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Timo Punkka

Timo has nearly twenty years of experience in new product development in different roles ranging from developer to manager. Since 2003 he has been passionate about applying Agile Methods to product development. This passion has taken him to coach teams in Europe, USA, China, India and South America. These encounters have included embedded system development, global new product development and even pure hardware development using Agile values and principles.

Currently he is helping security product teams in their journey to use Agile methods and Scrum. He is also a member of Enterprise Transition Community of Schneider Electric’s global agile transition. He got master’s degree in electrical engineering in 1998, and if time permits he tries to complete post-graduate studies in software engineering at Aalto University in Helsinki.


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Merlijn van Minderhout

Merlijn is an independent all-round IT consultant with experience in industry and financial environments. He participated in a wide range of projects in different roles covering all aspects of the software development lifecycle. He strongly believes that people, communication and continuous improvement are key factors in building high performance teams. He adopted agile processes and practices several years ago as they enable team collaboration and delivering efficient high quality results.


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Jenni Jepsen

Jenni’s focus in on helping individuals, teams and organizations use strategic communications to align with business goals, create meaning for stakeholders and build trust through the process. She does this with several very talented Agile coaches at goAgile, based in Roskilde, Denmark.

Jenni has extensive experience in communications – helping clients overcome internal and external barriers to accomplish business objectives. During the past 20 years, she has coached teams and leaders to enhance their messages and they way they communicate opening the way for better understanding, increased trust and quicker results – effectively leading teams to success.

Jenni speaks and consults on how organizations can increase their business value enterprise-wide. Her unique skill set aligns well with Agile methodologies – providing ways to improve communication and collaboration with customers and stakeholders. In addition, she has written several articles on various aspects of communications.


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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Twitter: @sannygr

Agile project leader, SCRUM master, Lean Agile coach, Agile trainer

Sandra Warmolts has been in Software Development for over 20 years. 11 years ago she got involved with Agile and stuck to it.
The commitment, openness, teamwork and collaboration between teams and business just suits very well.
She loves working with teams and they seem to like to work with her. She teaches them how being Agile can make their work so much fun and have a happy customer as well.
She's working with teams doing SCRUM, KANBAN, RUP, prince2, mixed and matched.
When she's not working, she a mom for her two kids, 10 and 9 years, and a lovely wife ;-). She likes to play tennis, do fitness and go out for dinner.


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Jani Söderström

Jani has 10 years of experience in product development in strictly regulated medical and security fields. Over the past 5 years he has been driving the adaptation of agile practices in multiple teams focusing in embedded software. Jani believes that TDD belongs to fundamental practices of an agile team, and because of its importance he has applied these techniques to all of his work including legacy code as well as green field code.

He has a master’s degree in electrical engineering but he and has also studied of embedded software. Jani is always ready to share his findings and is a public speaker on topics like harnessing legacy code with tests.


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Ron Ahonen


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Pierre Hervouet

Pierre Hervouet is the founder of Agile Lebanon and has been an active promoter of agile methodologies since 2009.

He has over 25 years of professional experience, where he addressed all dimensions of the software industry; from business analysis to development, implementation and project management, as well as, sales and marketing.

He worked in Paris, and then moved to Lebanon 2001, where he worked at Khatib & Alami, one of the major Lebanese engineering company.
He held the post of manager of the Business Performance & Business Development departments until July 2012.

It is after the XP days 2009 in Paris, that he started his journey in Agile.
Since then, he has implemented Agile methodologies with his 2 teams at K&A, and later, as a consultant in different Lebanese companies.
He created in 2013 a startup specialized in digital marketing, and the Agile Liban NGO.

He had a DESS (master degree) in “contrôle de gestion” (control management) from Paris I Sorbonne.


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Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe

Website: http://blog.nayima.be

Twitter: @pascalvc

Pascal Van Cauwenberghe is a consultant based in Brussels who tries to solve more problems than he creates. To do this, he uses Agile, Lean, Theory of Constraints and Systems Thinking techniques.

He’s one of the founders of the Belgian XP group and one of the organizers of XP Days Benelux. One day he and Vera Peeters invented the “XP Game“, because they couldn’t explain XP to their team and customers. They’ve learned that games are an ideal way to learn. Since then he tries to transform work into play…


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Jan De Baere

Jan is a change manager/advisor in the field of IT. His focus is towards business benefit and people. For GDF Suez (Electrabel Belgium, Netherlands and Germany) he transformed the project management method and introduced scrum, kanban and visual managment. Today Jan is a certified scrum professional active as Agile coach at Electrabel, Belfius, ADB...


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Marc Evers

Marc Evers

Website: http://www.qwan.eu

Twitter: @marcevers

Marc works as an independent coach, trainer and consultant in the field of (agile) software development and software processes. Marc develops true learning organizations that focus on continuous reflection and improvement: apply, inspect, adapt.

Marc organizes workshops and conferences on agile and lean software development, extreme programming, systems thinking, theory of constraints, and effective communication. Marc is co-founder of the Agile Open and XP Days Benelux conferences.

He knows how to combine his real-world experience with knowledge that is out there to create novel solutions. He likes to add games to highly-rated workshops, so participants have fun and learn from experience.


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Hans Kalle

Hans Kalle

Website: http://lnkd.in/dSWybQi

Twitter: @johannis68

At RIGD-LOXIA, Hans helps 45 software developers to grow in the art of agile software engineering to efficiently deliver business value to their customers. In his opinion craftsmanship and a professional working environment are essential. As a consequence teams have great fun working together and are proud of their achievements each and every time.

Hans' goal is to bring the right people together, to promote the standards of RIGD-LOXIA and to help build a professional and productive working environment. He challenges and coaches the professionals to constantly improve the process of delivering quality software which will meet the clients' needs.


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Emmanuel Gaillot

Emmanuel works as a team coach, (extreme) programmer, facilitator, trainer and systems jiggler. For the last 10 years he has been helping software makers to be better at, prouder of, and happier about the work they produce.

A regular speaker at many conferences on Agility, Emmanuel also co-organizes the annual Agile Open France conference. He is one of the founder (and still assiduous member) of the Coding Dojo in Paris. Emmanuel works in Paris at /ut7, a co-operated business he learns to hack with his fellow colleagues. He currently focuses his energy and passion on learning and teaching exotic languages, on shaping self-organizing structures and setting up co-learning spaces.


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François de Metz


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Laurent Bossavit

Laurent Bossavit is mainly known as an Agilist and was a recipient of the 2006 Gordon Pask award from that community. He is, however, a firm believer in belonging to many tribes and travels far and wide (intellectually and physically) to engage in the trade of that most precious commodity: useful ideas. He still likes to code though no longer doing so full-time, dividing his attentions between assisting Agile teams on technical and organizational matters, and the Institut Agile project which collects empirical evidence on the benefits and limitations of Agile practices. His hobbies include slaying software engineering Leprechauns and debugging his own brain.


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Yves Hanoulle

Twitter: @YvesHanoulle

I worked as software support, developer, team lead, trainer, agile coach, change artist, first follower, thought jockey. These days I call myself Creative Collaboration Agent.

I believe that IT is mainly about working with people.
A skill that can never be learned enough.

Team startups & retrospectives are my favorite ways to help your team(s).

y


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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Day. Well, to be correct, he has never missed a Benelux XP Day. He has been to several other XP Days in Germany, London, Paris, and in Italy, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes he XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? --Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they....?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants... He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Day to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well... What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP-days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean... it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days Benelux because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions


Personas made using South Park Studio by Janina Köppel.