Friday

Thursday

Friday

 

de Uitdaging

de Visie

het Samenspel

de Interactie

het Inzicht

06:55

 Rise and Shine

Olivier Costa

Max: 12 

08:00

Registration & Coffee

09:00

Opening

09:30

 Why and How to Use Docker for Development

Nelis Boucké
&
Erik Talboom

 Case Study: Agile Adoption at BASE

Jurgen De Smet
&
Luc Schillebeeckx

Max: 250 
 The software product reflects the health of your organisation

Patrique Haidar
&
Remi Christiaan Cool
Download slides

 Experience how to evolve your team from purpose and feedback

Martin van Dijken
&
Jeff Kok

Max: 36 
 Agile culture and how to nurture it with continuous learning

Inge Gorgon
Download slides

10:15

Why and How to Use Docker for Development

CONTINUED

 After continuous integration there is continuous validation.

Niels Talens
&
Hylke Stapersma

The software product reflects the health of your organisation

CONTINUED

Experience how to evolve your team from purpose and feedback

CONTINUED

 Be a Proud Explorer

Wim Heemskerk

10:45

Coffee break

11:15

Why and How to Use Docker for Development

CONTINUED

 SOS: will LeSS be SAFe?

Sandra Warmolts
&
Jan-Willem Zijlstra

Max: 30 
 Let's code like François Morellet would paint

Jonathan Perret
&
Étienne Charignon

Experience how to evolve your team from purpose and feedback

CONTINUED

 Create your own training games

Pierluigi Pugliese

Max: 40 

12:30

Lunch

13:30

Afternoon opening plenary

14:00

 Splitting into microservices with a vengeance

Linda van der Pal
&
Regina ten Bruggencate

Computer
Max: 30 
 High Impact Decision-making

Linda Dorlandt
&
Remi-Armand Collaris

Max: 24 
 Create an MVP mindset in your organization

Jasper Alblas

Max: 30 

Using PlayMais you can create anything. My kids love it, so what better way to use it to create something real in this workshop
 3D Speed Boat Retrospective

Sven Cipido
&
Johan Tré

Max: 20 
 Boost agility with Sociocracy 3.0!

Jef Cumps
&
Johan Decoster
Download slides

Max: 50 

15:15

Coffee break

15:45

Splitting into microservices with a vengeance

CONTINUED

 Quantified Value Requirements and Scrum

Bas van der Hoek
&
Marco Mulder

Download slides

Max: 20 
Create an MVP mindset in your organization

CONTINUED

 Agile Coaching explained and experienced

Paul Wijntjes
&
Paul Kuijten

Max: 30 
Boost agility with Sociocracy 3.0!

CONTINUED

17:15

Closing plenary

18:00

Closing drinks

Legend
Technology and Technique
Customer and Planning
Intro’s and Cases
Team and Individual
Process and Improvement

Session descriptions

max
12

Rise and Shine

Sink down your mind and wash away old habits

Olivier Costa

In this workshop you 'll get introduced to ancient Japanese techniques for modern-day challenges:

They help you with:

1. finding the relaxed condition as a precondition for balanced action

2. activating your whole system for maximum effectiveness

3. finding the patience to deal with complexity

4. getting up early and still have some fun 🙂

Goal of the session: Prepare your body & mind for Full Throttle energy and more!
Intended audience: anyone can attend
Expected experience: no experience required
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

In this workshop you 'll get introduced to ancient Japanese techniques for modern-day challenges:

They help you with:

1. finding the relaxed condition as a precondition for balanced action

2. activating your whole system for maximum effectiveness

3. finding the patience to deal with complexity

4. getting up early and still have some fun 🙂

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Why and How to Use Docker for Development

Nelis Boucké
& Erik Talboom

Docker is not just for deployment, it’s great for development too. It greatly simplifies setting up a development, CI or test environments, enabling agility in your organisation. It’s an excellent way to document and automate your infrastructure.

Yet so few developers seem to know and appreciate the advantages it could bring to them.

Goal of the session: Learn how to use docker to simplify their development.
Expected experience: No experience with docker is required, some experience with commandline will help if you want to try out some things yourself.
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Docker is not just for deployment, it’s great for development too. It greatly simplifies setting up a development, CI or test environments, enabling agility in your organisation. It’s an excellent way to document and automate your infrastructure.

Yet so few developers seem to know and appreciate the advantages it could bring to them.

In this session we will look to the possibility of using docker for development, with a mixture of examples, practical exercises by the participants and sharing experiences and struggles everyone faced in their experiments.

If possible, please bring a laptop for this session and make sure docker is already installed.

We split the session in three parts:

Part 1 (45' session): Why and how to use it for development. This is a mixture of explanation, demo's and discussions. No laptop or prior knowledge required.

Part 2 (30' session): Very basic hands-on docker session allowing you to run your first dockers. No prior knowledge required. Laptop required (or you can pair with someone with a laptop).

Part 3 (75' session): More advanced hands-on session, requiring basic docker knowledge (previous session is enough) and a laptop.

Back to program


max
250

Case Study: Agile Adoption at BASE

Flat organisations, integrated offshoring and a true culture shift.

Jurgen De Smet
& Luc Schillebeeckx

In summer 2014 Base Company (or a small part of it) decided to try out Agile, Scrum within their delivery department to soon discover that one needs to bring Agile beyond delivery. From there on the road has been bumpy with lots of learning to share.

Disruptive change or evolutionary change?

Project oriented organisation or product oriented organisation?

Keep PMO or not? How many PO’s?

Engineering practices and C.I.? Devops?

Many choices, many experiments.

Goal of the session: We want to inspire people and provide some idea's how they could make things happen in their company.
Intended audience: jan, marieke, philippe, george, vincent, joke, hank, ellen
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)

Who said an elephant can’t dance?

We’ll bring the story how an organisation where frustration and blame were the main values people lived by went to an organisation where collaboration and fun is prevailing.

• What was the situation mid 2014?

• How did it start?

• How did it grow beyond delivery?

• BOLD 1.0 disruptive change, from project to product including offshoring partner organisation

• BOLD 2.0 disruptive change, work going bottom-up instead of top-down

• Telenet merger brought extra opportunities

• Situation today

• Q&A

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


The software product reflects the health of your organisation

The secret to make scrum work is the architecture: the technical and the organisational structures need to be in sync.

Patrique Haidar
& Remi Christiaan Cool

Do you know your software product reflects the structure of your organisation?

The secret what makes scrum really work is the architecture covering the structures of both the underlying software product and organisation.

Customers may actually derive the health of your organisation by just using your product.

Are you confident they will be pleased?

This session will help you to improve the balance between the two forms of architecture.

Goal of the session: You realise there is a tight relationship between the organisational culture and its products. You only need to change one to change the other.
Intended audience: Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen, Marieke, Hank, Philippe,
Expected experience: everyone, however medior/senior level preferred (to be able to understand)
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

We know our software has bugs. We know we can improve our usability, performance and even security. We just don't get budget, time or a simple 'approval' to improve the overall quality of our software.

And then you downloaded a cool open source tool, which does what you need it to do.

How come that works fine, though it has bugs as you read in the changelog – which are funny to read, and it is even for free while your product hides so much of its true potential?

I realised long time ago to make a cool software product, regardless the software development methods you use, it is the architecture of the product and of the organisation that determines the quality of the product.

The secret to make scrum really effective is to keep the organisation around the product and the product itself in sync. If the product grows in one direction, you have to move your organisation in that direction too.

Think about it:

– the product complexity grows, the more specialists you hire

– the customer base grows, the organisation grows (sales, marketing, dev, HR, …)

– the customer base shrinks, the organisation shrinks (bye bye)

Then the company is being taken over, consumed into another organisation. Ever experienced what happened to the quality of the product after, say, 2 years (in general that is).

This session will be a thought provoking/sharing session about how to sync between organisation, the roles of people, and the product, its feature set.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
36

Experience how to evolve your team from purpose and feedback

Or how to continually optimize your team while building and validating your product

Martin van Dijken
& Jeff Kok
Download slides

The Teal way of thinking means you focus your entire organization on it's purpose, it's reason for being. Agile is all about using feedback to evolve products and teams. This session allows you to experience how to combine those two ways of thinking. We will show you Holacracy, one of the ways to lead your organization to becoming Teal. We will then have you experience how to combine that with Scrum in a simulation game.

Goal of the session: Experience the concept of Holacracy and a possible way to combine that with Scrum
Intended audience: Anyone interested in improving collaboration
Expected experience: No experience with Teal or Holacracy needed, basic Scrum knowledge expected.
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session

The Teal way of thinking means you focus your entire organization on it's purpose, it's reason for being. Agile is all about using feedback to evolve products and teams. This session is about how to combine those two ways of thinking.

More concretely, we are combining an up and coming methodology, Holacracy with the already accepted and embraced structure, culture and values of Scrum. We were struggling with this combination ourselves, but have some pretty good guidelines to start with. We would like to have you experience this combination in a fun but mind boggling experience session.

We will start with a basic introduction of Holacracy, so you don't need any prior experience for that. Your real teachings will be coming from what you pick up during your experience however. We're going to have you run through a simulated Holacracy setup where you and your team build a real product using the Scrum process. You will have to find ways how to get better at building, while also getting better at the communication and relations.

Still hope to improve further, please check out the outline and leave comments if you have any.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Agile culture and how to nurture it with continuous learning

Inge Gorgon

Getting the agile culture right is the most important thing in any agile transition. But is this only an IT thing? And once you get the spark going, how do you protect it from extinction. I will talk from my experience within IT and the world outside on this 'new way of working' culture and how it can be fuelled through continuous learning

Goal of the session: Insight that the agile culture is not an island. Inspiration on how to set up continuous learning in your company.
Intended audience: All
Expected experience: From beginners to experienced
Session Type: 30 min short experience report (30 min)

Getting the agile culture right is the most important thing in any agile transition. But is this only an IT thing? And once you get the spark going, how do you protect it from extinction. I will talk from my experience within IT and the world outside on this 'new way of working' culture and how it can be fuelled through continuous learning

I will talk from my own experiences in education (Freinet Schools) and citizen participation (G1000)and the way we set up a continuous learning habit in our company.

Back to program


After continuous integration there is continuous validation.

Let's talk about the need of automating the validation of business goals

Niels Talens
& Hylke Stapersma

There is a lot of focus on software craftsmanship and automation. We can build and deploy software very quickly with current technologies. However, it’s the post-deployment stage that worries me. How can we be sure that this new functionality has the impact the business needs? In other words: How can we be sure that we are building the right products?

Goal of the session: Give an insight of the way we automatically validate business goals. Let people know it exists.
Intended audience: Joke, Ellen, Bram, Hank, Vincent, Jan
Expected experience: None
Session Type: 30 min discovery session

There is a lot of focus on software craftsmanship and automation. We can build and deploy software very quickly with current technologies. However, it’s the post-deployment stage that worries me. How can we be sure that this new functionality has the impact the business needs? In other words: How can we be sure that we are building the right products?

When making software products we made a lot of assumptions about how functionality will help us in reaching business goals. But we rarely see those assumptions being validated afterwards. We mainly run back to the backlog and start on the next feature.

We found out that there is much overlay with impact mapping. In a sense continuous validation is the automation of impact mapping. Where impact mapping is a great way to define products, continuous validation makes sure your assumptions are being validated. Not once, but as long as the functionality is alive.

By measuring those assumptions, not only once after going live but automated and over time, when the software is being used we can really learn a lot. Do users really use this functionality as expected? Did this new feature affect the usage of an older one? In short: did we make the right assumptions? This way you can keep your product small but effective. Remove or change functionality and keep waste to a minimum.

This is what we call continuous validation…or is it validated learning?

We are building an open source framework called Gareth that can automate the validation of the business goals. With Gareth you can specify your business goals that can be automatically validated on production.

What is the reception of the idea? Can we think of use cases together?

This talk will give insights in:

  • How can we be sure that we are building the right products?
  • Why A/B testing and one time validations are not enough.
  • How the responsibility validation wether business goals are reached lies with business (aka prepare for some politics),
Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Be a Proud Explorer

Wim Heemskerk

I'm calling out the elephant in the room: being a 'creative' is just not experienced as professional behaviour. That's a century or two of cultural conditioning for you :(. Darn! I want to proudly self-identify as an Explorer! We all should!

Why? Because creative problem solving is the only job of the future. So I'm talking about you too! Let's take pride in bringing our creativity to the table.

Goal of the session: Awareness that we're tiptoeing around a taboo and how that's holding us back
Intended audience: all

I'm calling out the elephant in the room in this short talk: being a 'creative' is just not experienced as professional behaviour. That's a century or two of cultural conditioning for you :(. Darn! I want to proudly self-identify as an Explorer! We all should!

Why? Because creative problem solving is the only job of the future. So I'm talking about you too! Let's take pride in bringing our creativity to the table.

Back to program


max
30

SOS: will LeSS be SAFe?

Scaled frameworks compared

Sandra Warmolts
& Jan-Willem Zijlstra
Download slides
Download booklet

Compare how different aspects of scaling are handled in LeSS and SAFe, discuss the pro's and con's and select which framework will suit you best in your current business situation.

Goal of the session: Explore the different aspects of LeSS and SAFe.
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Vincent, Joke, Ellen,
Expected experience: Knowledge of Scrum and scaling
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

The Scrum of Scrums (SoS) was the first way to scale Scrum.

These days SAFe and LeSS are the most used scaling frameworks.

In this "SOS: will LeSS be SAFe?" session we will start with an introduction on LeSS and SAFe principles and basics. Then we will point out a couple of differences and similarities of these two frameworks. Every once and a while we will bring the SoS in as well.

The second part of the session is the "Compare LeSS-SAFe game". You, as a participant, will compare how different aspects are handled in these frameworks with a small team, you discuss the pro's and con's and select which framework will suit you best in your current business situation.

The third part of the session will be explaining your choice to the other groups.

The comparing will be supported with visuals and short notes about each concept in LeSS and SAFe.

After the session we will present a handout with the discussed aspects of LeSS and SAFe and where to find more background information about it.

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


Let's code like François Morellet would paint

Watch as we create art using creative coding

Jonathan Perret
& Étienne Charignon

Discover creative coding!

Goal of the session: Have fun. Watch real programming in action.
Intended audience: Developers of various levels (including Total Beginner), aspiring for entertainement about programming and art.
Expected experience: Beginners welcome
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

During this session, the presenters will live-code the drawing of a painting (or several) inspired by François Morellet's artwork.

Starting from a painting of the artist, we will start recreating it using the Processing programming language, then we will subtly drift as the audience gives us wishes and instructions.

This performance has already been run at the Beaubourg Museum in Paris for "La fête du code créatif" in November 2015, and at the XP2016 conference in Edinburgh.

Back to program


max
40

Create your own training games

From zero to team!

Pierluigi Pugliese

In your practice as a trainer/coach/ScrumMaster/… you are probably using already some games already available in the literature. But what do you do when you cannot find a proper one or when you simply don't find suitable the options you have available? Well… just create your own activities! Come and learn how…

Goal of the session: Learn how to create their own training/team building activities
Intended audience: Marieke, Leo, Bram, Vincent, Joke, Ellen
Expected experience: Advanced
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

In your practice as a trainer/coach/ScrumMaster/… you are probably using already some games already available in the literature. But what do you do when you cannot find a proper one or when you simply don't find suitable the options you have available? Well… just create your own activities! Come and learn how…

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

Back to program


max
30

Laptop

Splitting into microservices with a vengeance

How to split your problem into manageable chunks

Linda van der Pal
& Regina ten Bruggencate

Let's do some actual coding and learn about dividing your problems into microservices at the same time.

Intended audience: Hank, Leo, Jan, Ellen
Expected experience: any level
Session Type: 150 min hands on coding/design/architecture session

Last year we had a hands-on session about splitting up a domain into microservices. We looked at the game of poker and tried to model and program it, but after 2,5 hours we didn't have a single working microservice. This year I want to try this exercise again, but to make it work I want to start by looking at some of the ways in which you can divide a problem into microservices. Followed by a modeling session of the card game Set. Finally we'll try to build some services in pairs. This will be the largest chunk of the session, and most important of all, we'll add a bit of process to orchestrate the work.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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24

High Impact Decision-making

Crafting choices that make a difference

Linda Dorlandt
& Remi-Armand Collaris

Do you ever doubt your project decisions? Are you having trouble getting stakeholders to make balanced view on a problem? Do short term emotions overshadow discussions? Do you doubt that everyone is well-informed?

This workshop will provide you with a tool to craft decisions that make a difference. Put on your Agile glasses and visualize your goals. For this we will use Impact Mapping (a technique taken from the book "Impact Mapping" by Gojko Adzic). Using a case, you start with Why and work your way though Who and How before starting to think about What should be delivered. By the end of this session you will have done some Impact Mapping and with the help of a freely downloadable dialogue sheet can quickly start facilitating Impact Mapping yourself.

Goal of the session: Experience the power of using desired behaviour changes in the organisation as basis for a product breakdown
Intended audience: managers, analysts, facilitators, customer representatives
Expected experience: Experience with organisational change as driver for product development
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Do you ever doubt your project decisions? Are you having trouble getting stakeholders to make balanced view on a problem? Do short term emotions overshadow discussions? Do you doubt that everyone is well-informed?

This workshop will provide you with a tool to craft decisions that make a difference. Put on your Agile glasses and visualize your goals. For this we will use Impact Mapping (a technique taken from the book "Impact Mapping" by Gojko Adzic). Using a case, you start with Why and work your way though Who and How before starting to think about What should be delivered. By the end of this session you will have done some Impact Mapping.

Impact mapping is a technique that helps to start of a project together with your stakeholders. It visualizes all thinking steps and assumptions that lead to a product backlog. Everyone can participate in this process and all assumptions can be challenged in discussion but primarily in small experiments (Sprints). The exercise is guided by a freely downloadable dialogue sheet (A1 format poster with instructions, inspirational quotes and visual guidance). With the help of this dialogue sheet you can quickly start facilitating Impact Mapping yourself.

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max
30

Create an MVP mindset in your organization

Help your organization understand the importance of a Minimum Viable Product

Jasper Alblas

Is your organisation misusing the term MVP? How about you? After this workshop you will have no doubts anymore! You will be challenged to pay it forward to your organisation. Teach them! Work hard, play hard!

Goal of the session: Do you really comprehend what an MVP should accomplish? We will experience it, talk about it, hear about it and learn! Afterwards you can use this workshop to teach your organisation the importance of a true MVP!
Intended audience: Marieke Leo Bram Georges Vincent Joke Hank Ellen
Session Type: 150 min experiential learning session
Materials: Using PlayMais you can create anything. My kids love it, so what better way to use it to create something real in this workshop

In this workshop you will experience the importance of the use of a minimum viable product (MVP) and help you to let your organization experience it as well. After this session you will be able to help your colleagues by facilitating the workshop in your own organization. And we will have lots of fun as well!

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
20

3D Speed Boat Retrospective

Lego® and retrospective meeting hand in hand

Sven Cipido
& Johan Tré

Activating Fun Through Work!! During the retrospective we can use different techniques to identify improvements for teams. Speed Boat is one of the “Innovation Games®“ like Product Box, Remember the Future or Buy a Feature, … It is an ideal game for conducting a retrospective. Speedboat is an interactive, collective and fun way to identify constraints, obstacles, problems with our product or our project, then to prioritize actions in order to remove them! Games are very frequently about using metaphors. It helps people bend their mind towards the goal of the game. And last but not least, games are so much more fun to do! We have created a 3D model with Lego® of the Speed Boat game to use during your retrospective. In this 3D model you build your goal, what holds you off and what drives you forward as a team towards the built goal.

Goal of the session: Learn how to do a fun, but meaningfull Retrospective
Intended audience: Jan, Marieke, Leo, Bram, Philippe, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Hank, Ellen
Expected experience: Not really, it helps if you have experience with the Speed Boat Game.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

Activating Fun Through Work!!

Speed Boat, a boat with many facets…

The advantage of the Speed Boat metaphor is that the game can be very useful in a lot of contexts. Indeed, our boat is appropriate to represent our development project (which does not advance for some reason…), our product, subject to criticisms and comments of its users or the team in charge to bring agility to the organization.

And in the case of the 3D Speed Boat you will create a lot more metaphors on top of the existing canvas, as Lego allows you to freely build and express the basic elements of a retro.

We won’t bother you with a lot of Post-Its, only a few. But we will let you use a 3D model and your input will be expressed in all these metaphors.

Why? We live in a 3D world.

An example: When you were young and you were sick. You went to the doctor with one of your parents.

Now do you remember how sick you were? How much pain you had?

Most of the time: not.

But you will remember how the house of the doctor, the waiting room was looking, …

We live in a 3D world, and metaphors can help you remembering by visualizing them.

You will create a 3D canvas using Lego® on which you will have to build everything. And by visualizing the metaphors you will understand them better. By changing what you build you will abstract action points out of.

Although we already did 3 test runs and used the game 2 times during a retrospective, feedback on it is always welcome.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
50

Boost agility with Sociocracy 3.0!

Learn how to reinvent your team or organisation with Sociocracy 3.0

Jef Cumps
& Johan Decoster

This session will introduce you in an interactive way to Sociocracy 3.0 (S3), which is a pattern-based framework for happy, conscious and effective collaboration. S3 provides clear, actionable and proven patterns for self-organisation, decision making and structuring 'bossless' organisations. We will also share some stories on how we and customers experiment with S3 patterns.

Goal of the session: Participants wil both understand the basics of S3 and experienced some of its dynamics.
Intended audience: everyone
Expected experience: no experience needed
Session Type: 75 min discovery session

Are you struggling with helping teams to become truly self-organising? Would you like to move away from the slow, bureaucratic power hierarchy in your organisation without ending up in chaos? Are you open for experimenting with new idea's to help people be more effective?

If so, then this session is for you. You will get to know Sociocracy 3.0 (S3) as pattern-based framework for happy, conscious and effective collaboration. S3 provides clear, actionable and proven patterns for self-organisation, decision making and structuring 'bossless' organisations. It helps organisations that wish to evolve to a more 'teal' approach and can be considered as a principle-focused, modular alternative to Holacracy. (If it interests participants, we will summarize the differences between Holacracy and S3).

S3

This interactive workshop will combine basic background and theory about S3 with some real life stories, and practical exercises, to help you experience its dynamics. Some of the patterns we will explain are

– The S3 principles: equivalence, transparency, accountability, consent, empiricism, continuous improvement and effectiveness

– Artful Participation

– Roles and circles

– Consent decision making and proposal forming

– Drivers and navigating via tension

As a participant, you will run a real life exercise on Drivers and Consent Decision Making, possibly including Proposal Forming. This assures you will leave the room with a couple of concrete and practical idea's to try in your team or organisation!

There will be room for questions and discussion, as we will actively involve the audience. We'll use nice, visual flip charts and pictures of those will be shared after the session.

Jan is an experienced programmer. He comes to XP Days to get tips and tricks from experts and to learn about the latest trends in continuous integration and automated testing.
Jan

Marieke  is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis and has started to use some agile techniques. She feels it doesn't really work in her situation. She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have been practicing these things, and which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.
Marieke

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.
Philippe

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. He comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.
Hank

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
20

Quantified Value Requirements and Scrum

How to apply Gilb style requirements in the predominant Agile framework

Bas van der Hoek
& Marco Mulder

Many backlog items and even more opinions on how to prioritise them? Gilb to the rescue!

Goal of the session: Learn powerful techniques to decide what brings the most value to stakeholders
Intended audience: Joke, Ellen, Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

In most Scrum settings, there is only a vague notion of what real value is to stakeholders. Well before the rest of the world learned how to deliver iteratively and incrementally, Agile pioneer Tom Gilb helped many organisations to define what real value is to stakeholders and how to deliver it in small increments.

In this session you will do an exercise in several steps. We take you from a typical product backlog and show you how applying Tom Gilb's principles help in deciding what goes next, for who, and for what reason.

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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max
30

Agile Coaching explained and experienced

What is Agile Coaching? Experiment with coaching techniques yourself.

Paul Wijntjes
& Paul Kuijten

What is Agile Coaching? Experiment with important coaching techniques yourself.

The Agile Coaching Institute defines Agile Coaching competences. We will explore this model and use it to identify some important skills and experiment with them. The session is useful for practitioners and those who intend to use the services of an agile coach.

Goal of the session: Understand what good Agile Coaching looks like. Experiment with important competencies. Understand that there are different types of Agile Coaches.
Intended audience: Leo, Bram, Georges, Vincent, Joke, Ellen,For people who take up a central role like Scrum Master, Prodcut Owners, Agile Leaders & Managers.
Session Type: 75 min experiential learning session

What is Agile Coaching?

The Agile Coaching Institute defines Agile Coaching competencies. These include: Agile Lean practitioner, Teaching, Mentoring, Professional Coaching, Facilitation.

In this interactive, hands-on session you will gain an understanding of what competencies are helpful in Agile coaching. We will experience some essential competencies through exercises and you can solicit feedback from the other participants.

You will gain a better understanding of what type of Agile practitioner you are, and where you might want to go. Also, you will better be able to select an appropriate Agile coach for your specific context and situation

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. He wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic  people.
Leo

Bram has never missed an XP Days. Bram likes the XP Days because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.
Bram

Georges is a stressed project manager. He's heard that agile projects are more effective, more fun and rewarding.  He doubts if everything he's heard is true. But what if it is...?
Georges

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10%  in the next two years. He comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him.
Vincent

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.
Joke

Ellen is an agile coach. She wants to learn and share new ideas and experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.
Ellen

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Presenters

Olivier Costa

Olivier Costa

Website: http://www.aegisoft.be

Olivier Costa

is a member of Ken Gyu dojo where he learns Aikido from Frank sensei and his teacher Tomita Shihan a Japanese grand-master and student of the founder of Aikido: Morihei Ueshiba.

www.WareNatuur.be

He has always been involved in the whole software development cycle. From (business) idea over development & testing until release, follow up (business satisfaction) and maintenance. While writing code primarily in C#, he became an Agile Coach (for very diverse teams writing in very diverse languages) in search of teams he wants to work in.

My top 2 favorite books are:

  • Code Complete (2nd edition) – Steven McConnell
  • Domain Driven Design – Eric Evans



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Nelis Boucké

Nelis Boucké

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @nelisboucke

Nelis is a consult with a passion for building software systems and for practices that improve software quality. Most of what he does starts form the observation that the main challenges for great software are typically not in technology, but in fostering collaboration between people. This means that learning and sharing is key to success, both technically as in working with people.



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Erik Talboom

Erik Talboom

Website: http://co-learning.be/

Twitter: @talboomerik

Hi, I am Erik and I am a human being. This immediately defines my biggest passion in life: humans and what it means to be human. I love challenging people's current situation, their professional and/or personal status quo. Co-Learning how we can all improve our way of collaborating and working, while having fun at the same time. That is my second passion in life: playing. I play board games, roleplaying games and computer games and I am continuously looking for ways to use these concepts in my professional life as well. Because play does not mean silly, it means fun and motivating.

My professional life is centered around my passion for people and play. I mostly work as coach, both agile and lean as well as technical coach for software craftsmanship and personal coach for deeper psychological understanding. Next to that I try to be the game master as much as possible while facilitating meetings, stimulating collaboration and helping to channel creative energy.



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Jurgen De Smet

Jurgen De Smet

Website: http://www.co-learning.be

Twitter: @JurgenLACoach

Jurgen De Smet was a guiding hand in one of the largest Agile transitions in EU Healthcare. A master of game techniques for serious enterprise, he has taken companies in some of the most risk-averse, regulated industries and made them rock star achievers of sustainable innovation.

His Belgium-based company Co-Learning supports senior and middle management and entrepreneurs in building and sustaining learning organizations. Known as tough, knowledgeable, persistent and energizing, he is a driver of Gamestorming across Europe, a Innovation Games Qualified Instructor, and the first to implement Luke Hohmann’s concepts for citizen participation in Budget Games outside the United States.

Jurgen is a Certified LeSS (Large-Scale Scrum) Trainer, Licensed Management 3.0 trainer, the author of "Budgetspelen: Inwoners bepalen het beleid!" and "The Effective Use of Gamification Techniques in the Practical World", co-author of "Personal Kanban in a nutshell: The practical guide to personal happiness" and a leader in regional and global communities of practice that keep him freestyling with the best.



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Luc Schillebeeckx

Luc Schillebeeckx

Website: http://www.telenet.be

He is a Pragmatic and experienced IT Manager (25+ years) with strong drive for results and quality.

Proven track record in transformation of IT organizations, IT strategy, people and process management, IT sourcing strategy (offshoring), business/IT alignment and governance.

A couple of years ago Luc became passionate about Lean and Agile adoption and the change it can bring into the organisation and get the best out of the people. He is one of the leads in the transformation of the Telenet Group IT organisation towards Agile.”



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Patrique Haidar

Patrique Haidar

Website: https://nl.linkedin.com/in/patriquehaidar

Twitter: https://twitter.com/InspireWireNL

Started as embedded software engineer.

After 6 years, changed to consultant in healthcare.

From there turned into scrum master (a real one), then UX-designer, then product owner.

After 7 years of healthcare, I wanted to participate on senior management level to understand HOW decisions are made by the guys holding the budget.

After 1 year, returned to product owner, which has been the coolest role for me ever so far.



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Remi Christiaan Cool

Remi Christiaan Cool

Website: https://nl.linkedin.com/in/remichristiaancool

Twitter: @remichristiaan

I've been in the software business for around 19 years, not counting the days hacking away on my MSX home computer of course. Because of my journey from being an independent developer without staff (ZZP) to business owner and development manager during which I not only came into contact with development, product development, architecture, operations and security, but also (people) management, marketing, sales and other enterprisy stuff … I've gained an unique insight in how things work (from my perspective) which enables me to contact, connect and deepen with virtually all disciplines.



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Martin van Dijken

Martin van Dijken

Website: http://growingpassion.eu

Twitter: @sunsear

Software developer, agilist, maximizer, builder, freelancer.

My values have always centered around getting the greatest result out of the hours I spend working. Starting as a junior software developer, I was always interested in technologies that helped me and my team increase our output. During my long career as a developer, I learned more and more that the focus should first be on building the right thing. The way to achieve that is through interaction with the people around us meaning users, other developers, business owners, infrastructure teams etc. After leading and guiding the teams I was working in as a developer and Scrummaster, I'm now helping other teams as an agile coach.



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Jeff Kok

Jeff Kok

Website: https://nl.linkedin.com/in/jeff-kok-7173903

I work as a self employed Agile trainer, coach and project manager.

I have skilled myself in Agile since approxamatily the last 6 years, and I give Scrum Master and Product Owner trainings. Together with my colleagues at Agile Partners, we have been digging into Holacracy.



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Inge Gorgon

Inge Gorgon

Website: http://www.agileinthecore.net/

Twitter: @IngeGorgon

Inge Gorgon studied languages at the University of Ghent. In 1988 she was about to start her career as a teacher when she seized the opportunity to assist in an automated translation project at the University of Leuven. That began her career in IT as a developer, analyst and project lead in several companies. When Belgian IT Company Cegeka started its agile projects in 2005, Inge was there from the start. She worked as an experienced customer proxy, agile tester, scrum master and agile coach for clients such as NVSM, Argenta, ICTRA (IT department of the Belgian Railways), Telenet, ING and M-Team. Currently she is assisting LCM as Agile Coach in its Agile Transformation.



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Niels Talens

Niels Talens

Twitter: @NielsTalens

I am an Agile Consultant @codecentric in the Netherlands and currently working as Agile Coach and on a couple of incubator and open source projects like craftsmenlabs.com , amundy.com and getgareth.io. Very interested in both technique and in product development.



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Hylke Stapersma

Website: http://codecentric.nl

Twitter: hylke1982

Hylke is a software craftsman who is working as a consultant for codecentric and he is a contributor and maintainer of a small number of open-source projects. He is passionate about sharing ideas and knowledge on everything related to software development and delivery.



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Wim Heemskerk

Wim Heemskerk

Website: http://wimheemskerk.com

Twitter: @WimHeemskerk

Wim Heemskerk helps development & management teams to be agile in their practices. He is an agilist, a software craftsman, and a wave maker. As a hands-on change agent, he stimulates the alignment of process, technology and organisation. Wim connects the dots to translate complementary models and their principles to day to day actions.

He works to create lasting change, the kind people say they created and wanted themselves. He supports others on their quests for agility, leadership, great software, and test automation that actually pays off. You’ll find him coaching and training with passion and always ready to try a fresh angle.



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Sandra Warmolts

Sandra Warmolts

Twitter: @sannygr

Agile project leader, SCRUM master, Lean Agile coach, Agile trainer

Sandra Warmolts has been in Software Development for almost 25 years. 14 years ago she got involved with Agile and stuck to it.

The commitment, openness, teamwork and collaboration between teams and business just suits very well.

She loves working with teams and they seem to like to work with her. She teaches them how being Agile can make their work so much fun and have a happy customer as well.

She's working with teams doing SCRUM, KANBAN, SAFe, LeSS, DevOps and "just their own thing".

When she's not working, she a mom for her two kids, 13 and 12 years and a lovely wife ;-). She likes to play tennis, do fitness and go out for dinner.



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Jan-Willem Zijlstra

Jan-Willem Zijlstra has been an Agile enthousiast for ten years. Starting as a project leader using RUP and transferring to an Agile coach helping teams to become a team and combining work pleasure with productivity. Jan-Willem converts his knowledge of Agile, Scrum, Kanban, LeSS and SAFe into practical use for teams and the organisation.

In private life Jan-Willem loves to travel, every holiday is to another destination (it used to be every holiday to a new country, but that's a thing of the past), in the weekends Jan-Willem enjoys riding his mountainbike in the Dutch woods, the more mud the better.



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Jonathan Perret

I am an agile-enlightened, test-infected, fun-seeking software developer. My current interests: advanced functional programming in Haskell, programming with and for children, helping build and sustain /ut7, a very special cooperative.



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Étienne Charignon

Website: http://ut7.fr

Twitter: echar

Professional software developer. My passion for computer started when I was 12 years old and never left me (I can’t belive I’m already 42 !). I am particularly interested in programming, and my passion got even deeper when I discovered the world of Extreme Programming and Agile software development in 2004. I am one of /ut7’s worker-owners.



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Pierluigi Pugliese

Pierluigi Pugliese

Website: http://blog.connexxo.com

Twitter: p_pugliese

Pierluigi Pugliese started hacking code so long ago that he cannot remember exactly when anymore. He worked many years in the mobile telecommunication business, both as programmer and as a team leader, providing software for several mobile phones of known brands.

Currently he works as a consultant for software organisations and coach for individuals and teams, focusing on software development and software processes, helping them implementing sound and agile solutions.

Pierluigi is based in Munich and operates through his company Connexxo (www.connexxo.com).



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Linda van der Pal

Website: http://jduchess.org

Twitter: @DuchessFounder

Linda is a developer at iProfs, the founder of Duchess, Java Champion and an active member of the Agile (and Java) community. She has been a Java developer for several companies since 2002. To her Agile seems the most promising method of getting software done, and so she tries to learn as much about it as she can.



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Regina ten Bruggencate



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Linda Dorlandt

Linda Dorlandt

Website: http://www.praktischopweg.nl

Momentarily I am involved in managing business change initiatives by the Facilitaire organisation at the Dutch National Police. In this work I facilitate connections between team members and encourage them to take responsibility and in doing that I help self organization teams to emerge. For six years I was also a member (besides project and change manager) of the Works Council of FloraHolland which provides me with a lot of knowledge of the organization and its surroundings. The Works Council of FloraHolland was transforming itself to be more innovative and as second chairman of the council one of my responsibilities is putting together the training program to get there. I have written my Bachelorthesis in Business Psychology about the influence of empowerment on business results. That explains my interest in new insights in improving peoples ways of working and in Agile and Scrum as tools to reach that goal.

http://www.linkedin.com/in/lindadorlandt



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Remi-Armand Collaris

Remi-Armand Collaris

Website: http://praktischopweg.nl

Twitter: @racollaris

Remi-Armand Collaris believes the main challenge of todays organisations it to create an environment in which people can blossom in cooperation with others. Autonomy and teamwork are important ingredient for that. In his work as organisational coach he helps teams to improve team results by taking ownership over their way of working and employing team learning practices. Agile, Scrum, LeSS and Lean are some of his sources of inspiration for practices to make continuous improvement engaging and provocative.



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Jasper Alblas

Jasper Alblas

Website: http://www.agilecoaching.works

Twitter: @alblasj

I started my career as a software developer and discovered Agile in 2012, following my Scrum Master course. I’ve been hooked on Agile ever since. Scrum being the framework I mostly work with, but also Kanban, Lean (Start-up) and others. Currently also diving into the experimental new forms of organisations, like the Lean Startup, Holocracy and other forms of network organised structures.

I work with organisations on their culture: helping the organisation and it’s people strive for their evolutionary purpose.



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Sven Cipido

Sven Cipido

Website: http://www.equalminds.eu

Twitter: @cipidos

Agile Coach, Trainer, LeSS Certified Practitioner, Red Belt Collaboration Architect and Scrum Master.

Already active since 1995. Started as a programmer for PLC, went over to AS/400 and finally got a deep dive into Microsoft Technologies. First as a developer and in the end as a software architect. In 2008 he came in contact with Scrum and saw the light. He got his Scrum Master training from Joseph Pelrine that same year. Now he’s an Agile Coach at Equalminds. He loves to implement the fun part as a Coach/Game Master actively using the Innovation Games and Lego.

Already a few times, he was a speaker at the XPDays, where he presented “The Frog Factory, A Kanban Experience” and “The Agile Quizzzitch”. He’s also the co-author of the book “The Agile Quizzzitch” and worked together with some other Agile Coaches on the Dutch translation of the book “Toolbox for the Agile Coach” of Jimmy Janlén.



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Johan Tré

Johan Tré

Website: http://co-learning.be

Twitter: @johan_tre

Johan brings a depth of experience as a facilitator, coach and Scrum Master along with a zeal for efficiency.

These skills contribute to the success of Co-Learning, a collaborative network of Agile professionals.

During company-wide Agile adoption efforts, his coaching vastly improved decision-making at all levels and aligning with the customer’s perception of value.

The engagements he likes best typically conclude with shorter, more focused meetings, flatter organizational structure and more purposeful communication.

Meanwhile, Johan’s technical background supports high quality craftsmanship, strengthening movement toward collective code ownership.

His holistic approach – combining technical knowledge with insightful leadership – enables everyone, from novice to expert, to feel appreciated and connected during times of change.

He demonstrates how to navigate complexity by tapping into their collective intelligence.

Helping to see benefit of self-organisation, people find safe space in which to trust each other, take risks, and express their creative best.



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Jef Cumps

Jef Cumps

Website: http://www.ilean.be

Twitter: @jcumps

Jef Cumps is a very experienced coach and trainer supporting multiple large organisations in their transition towards more agility. He is and has been leading enterprise changes covering all levels (individual, teams, management, organization).

As a trainer, Jef has gained a lot of experience in training various topics: Scrum, Lean, Agile, Kanban, S3, 'Teal', visual facilitation, communication, people management and coaching skills. Next to his knowledge and experience, his major asset is his coaching attitude getting the most out of people and organizations.

Jef is Certified Kanban Practitioner, Certified Scrum Trainer and Certified Scrum coach. Jef presented several sessions on XP Days and other conferences in the past.



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Johan Decoster



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Bas van der Hoek

Bas van der Hoek

I have been involved in software development for over 25 years, and in many different capacities: support, sales, marketing, education, architecture, and management. Whatever I did, I always enjoyed it very much and brought a lot of enthusiasm and energy. Over the years the lines of code I write has seen a decline, but I still get apps in the App Store 🙂

These days I spend most of my time training and coaching large and small organizations in becoming more agile and deriving more value from the work they do.

See LinkedIn.



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Marco Mulder

Marco Mulder

More than fifteen years ago, I was lucky to be part of a successful large-scale Agile product development company: OTI. It was an IBM subsidiary where we developed Eclipse, by now a well-known software development environment. After that great experience with Agile, I became one of the frontrunners of Scrum in The Netherlands. I regularly co-trained with Scrum founder Jeff Sutherland and co-founded the Dutch Scrum community nlscrum.

For over ten years, as a Scrum coach and trainer I've had a positive impact on countless organizations: small start-ups, large companies, governmental organisations and even schools Besides my training and coaching experience, I have many years of hands-on experience as software developer and as Scrum Master.

See LinkedIn.



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Paul Wijntjes

Paul Wijntjes

Website: http://www.agileadvies.nl

Paul Wijntjes is an experienced Agile Coach at Agile Advies.

Paul is specialized in coaching organizations to be truly Agile, instead of just doing Agile practices. He is used to follow his intuition and works from genuine contact with teams and individuals on various levels in the organization. He lives the values of Transparency, Inspect and Adapt. This approach leads to true lasting changes in the organization.

Paul has a background in Technical Automation and Mechanical Engineering. He worked as a Mechanical Engineer, Software Developer, Consultant, Facilitator, Architect and as a Project Leader. In the last 10 years he has grown into a true Agile specialist.



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Paul Kuijten

Paul Kuijten is an experienced Agile/Scrum coach, practicing Scrum since 2006.

Paul is a recovering Prince II practitioner, who once was a pretty bad programmer.

Paul has trained hundreds of people on Agile/Scrum and related topics and regularly presents to various audiences. Paul is a Scrum.org certified Scrum trainer.

Having introduced Scrum in multiple organizations, Paul knows about the pitfalls along the way and the hard work required. More importantly, Paul knows the rewards when you persevere.

He helps organizations move towards more business agility, and effective product development.



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Participants

Jan
Jan

Jan has been working as a programmer for 5 years now. Jan loves to program. He knows a lot of languages, and a lot of tools. At work, he he is not always happy because the circumstances often force him to deliver the quality he knows he can reach. Jan explores new technologies and trends on the internet and in books and magazines. At night Jan contributes to an open source project together with 10 other guys, from all over the world. That's where he heard about agile methodologies. In the open source group, he is used to work with unit tests, but he hopes to get some real in-depth tips and tricks from experts at the XP Days conference. He is also interested to learn about the latest trends for continuous intergration tools and test automation.

Meet Jan at the following sessions

Marieke
Marieke

Marieke is part of a team that delivers product software on a regular basis. Several months ago, her team had an introductory training on extreme programming and scrum. Some of the ideas she learned about seemed interesting enough, but she is not sure if this methodology is applicable in their particular situation. After the course, some of her colleagues started to write unit tests, but there still are only a few, and they are not run very often, as far as Marieke can see. They also started to do a daily standup meeting, because according to the trainers that is a tool to enhance communication within the team. But these meetings are rather boring, and they tend to take 1/2 hour, every day. Team members are grumbling about wasting their time.

Marieke started to think all this agile stuff is only an unusable hype. But then she heard about XP Days, and she thought "well, let's give it another chance, if 150 people go to this conference, for 11 years in a row now, maybe there is more to it". She hopes she can hear from real people in real teams how they have applied these techniques, which problems occurred in their situation, and what kind of consequences that had for them.

Meet Marieke at the following sessions

Leo
Leo

Leo has been around forever. He has seen everything, done everything. Over the years, Leo has been working as a developer, as a project lead, as a tester, as an analyst, as a manager, and as a consultant. He knows from experience that everything comes back, if you only wait a few years. He has learned that the same problems and the same solutions have been invented and re-invented a hundred times in computer science. He has lived through the rise and fall of uncountable new technologies and methodogies. All of them brand new, all of them the one and only forever best way to make software. Leo wants to go to XP Days because he thinks it's an excellent opportunity to meet with a lot of young, smart and enthusiastic people.

Meet Leo at the following sessions

Bram
Bram

Bram has never missed an XP Days. He has been to several other conferences in Europe, and also attended quite a few bigger agile and other conferences. Bram likes the XP Days, because of the friendly and informal atmosphere. Every year he goes back to work from XP Days full of energy, with a bag full of new ideas and techniques.

Meet Bram at the following sessions

Philippe
Philippe

Philippe comes to XP Days because his boss told him to go. He has never heard about this agile stuff. He doesn't know what it is, or what it can be used for. He guesses it is something his boss wants to buy. He doesn't really care, because going to this conference means that he will be away from the hectic chaos in the office for 2 days.

mmm I think maybe it is not very useful for Philippe to come to the XP Days? -Vera

Why not? Let Philippe come, let him relax and have a beer and dinner with agile people. He might even attend some presentations. And, once he's relaxed, who knows what could happen? –Pascal

Meet Philippe at the following sessions

Georges
Georges

Georges is a project manager. His life is filled with stress, deadlines, difficult programmers, unhappy customers and demanding bosses. Sometimes he wonders if he's chosen the right career.

Lately, Georges has been hearing more and more about agile methods. Some of his ex-colleagues have converted from project management to agile coaching. They tell him tales of vibrant, exciting, fun projects where customers and developers live in perfect harmony. That can't be true. They must be exaggerating. Or are they….?

Meet Georges at the following sessions

Vincent
Vincent

Vincent is the IT manager of a large company. His teams don't do too badly. Some projects are allright; some don't fully satisfy their users. The CEO has asked him to propose a plan to increase the efficiency of his department by 10% in the next two years. So, Vincent looks around for solutions that might help him to create and implement the plan. He has looked at a lot of things: processes, tools, consultants… He's heard that some other companies (even some reputable companies) have had success with "agile" methods, so he comes to the XP Days to get a taste of what "agile" can offer him. He doesn't know what to expect. Hippy surfer dudes? 18 year old wizz kids with piercings? Greybearded hackers? Oh well… What does he have to lose?

Meet Vincent at the following sessions

Joke
Joke

Joke is a product manager for a succesful product company. Joke understands her customers needs, she has lots of ideas for new features that would enhance the product. She knows that this product really enhances its user's lives. That's one of the reasons her company is so succesful. But they have trouble keeping up with customer demand. Joke finds it hard to talk to the development team, to make them understand what she needs in the product. If only she and the development team could work together more efficiently, they could make this product make more of a difference. Maybe this "agile" stuff can help? How does product management work in agile projects? Joke hopes to meet some developers and other product managers who can help her and give her some tips.

Meet Joke at the following sessions

Hank
Hank

Hank is a motivated and experienced software engineer cum system architect who spends his days knee deep in the quagmires of enterprise automation. Appalled and bemused by the shocking waste of time, money, and people, he does his best to bring the joy back in the life of those around him by introducing agile methodologies wherever he sees the opportunity. Hank comes to the XP Days to share with and learn from like-minded colleagues.

Meet Hank at the following sessions

Ellen
Ellen

Ellen is an agile coach. She's been using agile methods for a few years now. XP, SCRUM, Lean… it doesn't matter much to her. She's more interested in doing things that matter to deliver value for her customers. She wants to work with a happy team, doing meaningful work.

Ellen wants to learn new ideas and share experience of techniques that work. She comes to XP Days because of its friendly and collaborative atmosphere.

Meet Ellen at the following sessions